SEARCH for STUDENTS: Unit 02 – An Angelic Proclamation

INTRODUCTION
What better way could Jesus understand our problems and temptations and show us how to overcome them than to face them Himself? Hebrews 4:15 tells us that He “was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin.” Since He has been through suffering and temptation He knows what it is like when we suffer and are tempted, and He is wonderfully able to help us. See Hebrews 2:18.
QUESTION
  1. What did Jesus possess that helps in overcoming temptation? See verse 1. Can we have the same help?
  2. Would it have been wrong for Jesus to have turned that stone into bread? Give a reason for your answer.
  3. What did Satan use in trying to cause the Lord to accept his offer of the kingdoms of the world? Were these kingdoms his to give?
  4. When Satan tempted Jesus to worship him, how did the Lord answer him? Can we defeat Satan in the same manner?
  5. As a last resort, Satan also tried using Scripture to make his final temptation acceptable to the Lord. What was that Scripture, and how does Satan use Scripture when trying to deceive people today?
  6. What is temptation, and will it come to a well-established Christian? Is it sin?
  7. Write several ways by which we can overcome temptation.
  8. While God has made it possible for everyone to be overcomers, what should a person do if he has yielded to the temptation to sin? See Revelation 2:5.

 

SEARCH for STUDENTS: Unit 02 – The Holy Trinity

INTRODUCTION
The New Testament states that one of God’s purposes in sending Christ to this world was to reveal Himself more fully to man (John 1:17-18). The study of the Holy Trinity is a glimpse into God’s divine nature as revealed to us more clearly in the New Testament, for without this fundamental precept there can be no deity of our Lord Jesus Christ, or of the Holy Spirit. Through the Trinity we see real unity in God the Father’s love, Jesus’ grace and intercession, and the Holy Spirit’s comfort and presence in us.
QUESTION
  1. Genesis 1:1 states, “In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.” The Hebrew word for God here is the plural form, “Elohim.” Used together with the singular form of the word, “created,” we see the unity of the divine Godhead in the work of creation. Verse 2 of this chapter refers to “the Spirit of God,” completing the reference to the Trinity. What words in each of the following verses demonstrate the Trinity? See Genesis 1:26; 3:22; 11:7 and 1 John 5:7.
  2. What does the last part of 1 John 5:7 tell us about the Trinity?
  3. In the Matthew account of John’s baptism of Jesus, describe how each person of the Trinity was revealed.
  4. Why do you think the account of John’s water baptism of Jesus occurs in all of the four Gospels?
  5. John the Baptist spoke of Christ’s ministry as fulfilling and exceeding his own. What promise was given to those who believed in Christ regarding the third Person of the Trinity—the Holy Spirit? See Matthew 3:11 and Mark 1:8. What promise is given to people today in this respect? See Acts 2:38-39.
  6. What is the contribution of each person of the Godhead toward the salvation of mankind? See Romans 5:5- 6. For a clearer understanding of the work of the Holy Spirit, see John 16:8,13-14.
  7. In what attitude of prayer and worship should we come into the presence of the Triune God who extends to us His infinite authority and power? See Isaiah 55:6-7; 57:15 and Hebrews 13:15.

SEARCH for STUDENTS: Unit 02 – God’s Providential Care

INTRODUCTION
We walk through a world that is fraught with dangers, and the only source of true protection is God. In our text, God’s providential care is beautifully shown by the angel’s directing Joseph to take the young child Jesus and His mother to Egypt. However, God’s care is not limited to the preservation of His Son. It is fulfilled in the life of each one who follows His Word.
QUESTION
  1. Give a definition of divine providence. Who enjoys this blessing?
  2. By whom and for what reason was Joseph instructed to take Jesus and Mary into Egypt? Why was Egypt chosen? See Hosea 11:1 and Matthew 2:15.
  3. Why did Herod order the killing of children who were two years of age and under? See Matthew 2:16-18.
  4. In Matthew 1 and 2, how many times did an angel appear to Joseph with instructions from God? List several ways that God shows His providence today.
  5. In Psalm 91, a key is given by which divine providence may be obtained. What is that key?
  6. In applying the Scripture to our day, make a list of at least six blessings promised to us in Psalm 91.
  7. When the devil tempted Jesus (Matthew 4:6), he quoted Psalm 91:11-12. What part of that quote did the devil leave out? Why did Jesus resist the temptation?
  8. Psalm 91:14-16 seems to be a direct quote from God. What might be meant by “set his love upon me,” and “shew him my salvation”? See John 3:16.
  9. Give an example of divine providence in your life, or in the life of someone you know.

SEARCH for STUDENTS: Unit 02 – God’s Promise Fulfilled

INTRODUCTION
Jesus made a permanent impression on everyone He came into contact with. Even Herod and the others who rejected Him were never the same again. Today, all who will receive Him, as Simeon and Anna did, will obtain the benefit of the promises recorded in the Word of God. Jesus is our salvation and through Him we have a new outlook on life and a beautiful hope for the future.
QUESTION
  1. What are two moral attributes mentioned in Luke 2:25, which adorned Simeon’s life?
  2. Who revealed to Simeon that he would not see death before he had seen the “Lord’s Christ”? What role does that Person have in our lives today?
  3. Why did Simeon bless God and know, with confidence, that he could now “depart in peace”?
  4. What was the significance of Mary’s giving her firstborn Son the name Jesus? See verse 21.
  5. What attitude is manifested in the lives of each of those who recognized the fulfillment of promise and were privileged to see the Baby Jesus?
    • The Shepherds — Luke 2:15-17, 20
    • The Wise Men — Matthew 2:9-11
    • Simeon — Luke 2:27-28
    • Anna — Luke 2:38
  6. Look back over the past four lessons. Briefly summarize what promises were given, and state how these were fulfilled in the text of today’s lesson.
  7. What parallel can we draw between the days in which we are now living and the promises of God, and the prophecies of His Word which were fulfilled by Jesus’ first advent?
  8. Noting the key verse, what connection can be found in holding fast the profession of our faith without wavering, and God being faithful to His promise?

 

 

 

SEARCH for STUDENTS: Unit 02 – What “Star” Are You Following?

INTRODUCTION
The sighting of the star in the east was the beginning of the diligent search by the Wise Men. Their mission served to answer the question, “Who is Jesus?” We have the opportunity to follow their example as we seek for things of spiritual value so that we might know Christ better.
QUESTION
  1. How do you think the Wise Men knew that they were searching for the One who was “King of the Jews”? See Matthew 2:2.
  2. Why do you think Herod, and all Jerusalem with him, was so troubled upon hearing of the newborn King?
  3. How did the chief priest and the scribes know where Christ should be born? See Micah 5:2.
  4. Why were the Wise Men so happy to see the star again after they departed from the king?
  5. What did the Wise Men do before they presented their gifts to the newborn King?
  6. What gifts can we offer the Lord today? See Romans 12:1 and Hebrews 13:15-16.
  7. The Wise Men followed the star which led them to Christ. God still gives man a light to follow. What do you think directs us to Christ today?
  8. Are many seeking to follow the Savior today? Why or why not?
  9. The Wise Men followed the star even though the journey was difficult. They persevered until they reached their goal. Using the Wise Men as an example, what should our attitude be as we strive for the heavenly goal?

SEARCH for STUDENTS: Unit 02 – An Angelic Proclamation

The angelic proclamation, “For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour, which is Christ the
Lord” (Luke 2:11), announced God’s greatest gift to mankind. This message was given to the shepherds
on the Judean hills. They did not doubt the wondrous declaration, for they saw the attendant glory, and
they would soon spread the news to others. God’s angels must have realized the importance of the announcement, for as soon as the good tidings were made known, a multitude of the heavenly host joined
in the exultation, “Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, goodwill toward men” (Luke 2:14).

1. Where was Mary living previous to the birth of Jesus? Where was it prophesied that Jesus should be born? See Micah 5:2.

2. What circumstance did God use to make sure Mary would be in Bethlehem at the birth of Jesus?

3. Why do you feel God chose to proclaim the good news to shepherds rather than to some authoritative figures?

4. What did the shepherds do with the great news that was told to them?

5. Write what you feel is meant by the word pondered as used in verse 19.

6. Read Philippians 2:5-8. In your own words, explain why you feel it was necessary for Jesus to be born “in the likeness of men.”

7. The celebration of Christmas can be used to spread the story of Jesus. Write down some ways the Christmas season can provide opportunities for evangelistic outreach.

SEARCH for STUDENTS: Unit 02 – Gabriel Speaks Out

INTRODUCTION

Our lesson is part of the Christmas story which undoubtedly has been told and retold more than any other story ever written. So without dwelling long on the historical fact of Jesus’ birth, let us consider why God
singled out Mary for the highest honor ever bestowed on a woman. Her willingness to submit to God’s plan was, no doubt, one of the reasons He chose her over all the young virgins of the house of David to be the mother of His Son, Jesus.

1. In Bible times, God often used angels to carry messages to people. Since this was so, why do you think Mary was troubled at the angel’s greeting?

2. What did the angel say when he noticed Mary was troubled?

3. Do you think that Mary showed a lack of faith when she questioned the angel about how this could be?
Explain.

4. What was Mary’s response to the message that her child would be called the Son of God? What characteristics did she demonstrate by that reply?

5. In what ways did Mary exhibit these character traits?

6. Why are the attributes which Mary exemplified necessary for one serving the Lord today?

7. In reference to our key verse, the first phrase implies that doing the will of God may need to be learned.
What are some of the ways the Lord teaches us? What can we do in order to be apt learners?

8. What are some of the benefits that are promised us if we are submissive to God? In addition to our text, see John 7:17, Romans 8:14-17, and Romans 12:2

SEARCH for STUDENTS: Unit 02 – Who Is Jesus?

INTRODUCTION

Prophecy — Fulfillment

Isaiah 9:6-7 — Matthew 1:16

Isaiah 7:14 — Matthew 1:18-25

Micah 5:2 — Matthew 2:1

Prophecy Yet to be Fulfilled

Acts 1:10-11

1 Corinthians 15:51-52

1 Thessalonians 4:16-17

Throughout the 4000 years of history before the coming of Christ, we can see how God masterminded His plan of salvation which would be fulfilled in Christ. In the Old Testament, we find many authors of different ages and places supplying the bits, pieces, types, shadows, and detailed predictions which describe Christ’s purpose in coming to this earth, His manner of life, the reason for His death, and His triumph over death through the Resurrection.

The same prophets who gave us advance details of Christ’s first coming speak expressly of a coming day when righteousness will triumph over evil. As surely as the details predicted were fulfilled in Christ’s first coming, just so surely shall this earth experience the Rapture of the saints, and then the coming of Christ with His saints for 1000 years of peace, goodwill toward men!

QUESTION

  1. What is prophecy? (Consult Webster or a Bible dictionary.)
  2. What is the mark of a true prophet? See Jeremiah 28:9.
  3. Who received this promise, “. . . and in thee shall all families of the earth be blessed”? See Genesis 12:3. Explain in your own words what this promise might mean.
  4. Isaiah wrote over 700 years before Christ was born. Compare Isaiah 7:14 with Matthew 1:18-25 and comment on how we benefit by studying prophecy and its fulfillment. See also 2 Peter 1:21.
  5. Why is the virgin birth of Christ important? See Luke 1:26-27, 35.
  6. Who is the prophet referred to in Matthew 2:5-6? And how do we know that the Jewish scribes of King Herod’s time knew about this prophecy and understood it?
  7. Memorize the five beautifully descriptive terms used in Isaiah 9:6 to denote Christ’s names. Place the name which you think best applies opposite the New Testament Scriptures given below:
    • Matthew 21:15; Acts 2:11
    • Matthew 28:20
    • John 14:27
    • John 3:1-2
    • John 10:29-30
  8. Describe in your own words the future event pictured in 1 Corinthians 15:51-52 and 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18.
  9. Summarize the event prophesied by the angels in Acts 1:11 which has not yet happened. See Zechariah 13:1-2,6,9; 14:3-11 and Revelation 20:4. How are we certain that this event will take place?
  10. In Matthew 24, Jesus gave us signs which were to immediately precede His return to earth. These included the appearance of false Christs, wars, famines, pestilences, earthquakes, persecution of Chris- tians, apostasy of previous believers, worldwide preaching of the Gospel, and the re-emergence of Israel as a nation. Seeing these signs around us, we cannot help but conclude that we are living in the time of the soon coming of our Lord. Among the living, who will be caught up to join the Lord in the air when the Trumpet of the Lord sounds for the Rapture of the saints? See John 8:31; 1 John 1:7 and Revelation 2:3.

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


Numbers 24:17; Isaiah 53:1-12

THEME THOUGHTS


Old Testament history paints a colorful picture of God’s dealing with man, but the New Testament brings us to the climax of God’s redemptive work—the Messiah, Jesus Christ.

“Who is Jesus?” is the thought-provoking question that establishes our theme for this quarter. Looking into the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, we trace the story of Jesus’ time on earth, including His birth and some of the major events of His life.

We find, as we delve into this story, that the incidents and occurrences recorded in a biographical sketch of Jesus hold many important lessons relevant to our lives today.

Some of the highlights of Jesus’ ministry and His personal example to us are brought out in such lessons as His calling of the twelve disciples, His example in resisting temptation, and His formula for happiness as found in the Beatitudes. The quarter concludes with one of Jesus’ parables which emphasizes the importance of being firmly grounded so that we might be able to grow as Christians.

The purpose of this quarter is to learn about Jesus Christ, not just as a personage of Biblical history, but as a living Savior who wants to be directly and personally involved in our lives.

INTRODUCTION


Included in the establishing of God’s written Law was the process to be followed in administering the Law. The tribe of Levi was charged with the care of the sanctuary and the serving. Aaron and his sons, being of the tribe of Levi, were set apart for the priesthood; and this office was passed down from father to son.

QUESTION


  1. What was the purpose of the Old Testament priesthood?
  2. Why was it necessary for an Old Testament priest to make an offering for his own sins?
  3. How was Aaron chosen to be the first high priest?
  4. Why was the Old Testament priesthood not intended to be permanent? See Hebrews 8:4-11.
  5. Read Hebrews 7:11-16. Was Jesus a descendant of Aaron? After what order was He a priest?
  6. What were some of the things Christ went through to obtain this better priesthood? See Hebrews 5:7-9.
  7. How is it that Christ can so readily relate to our disappointments, frustrations, and trials? See Hebrews 2:16-18.
  8. Why would you rather be under Christ’s priesthood than the Levitical priesthood?
  9. What is God’s promise to one in the time of need? See Hebrews 4:16.
  10. Read Numbers 16:41-48. In what way was Aaron a mediator for the Children of Israel? In what way is Christ our mediator today?

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


Numbers 17:1-11

THEME THOUGHTS


It is not difficult to go through the Bible and compile an extensive list of first events from which we can learn valuable lessons. Most people are interested in how or when something started and who started it. This quarter will focus on beginnings. The first two lessons deal with the beginning of everything—Creation and the first man. The next two are about the first sin and the first plan of escape from God’s judgment for sin. The next lesson is about the people who built the first “skyscraper” and the pitfalls of trying to be independent from God.

Four Bible characters will be studied: the first Hebrew, Abraham; the first leader, Moses; Israel’s first priest, Aaron; and the first king of Israel, Saul. There also will be a lesson on God’s first written Law.

The point of studying these lessons is to help us get a better understanding of some of the firsts in Bible history and, more importantly, to learn that, since the beginning of our world, each of these has played an important part in Gods plan for our lives. We want to grow spiritually from what we have learned.

INTRODUCTION
QUESTION
  1. Make a list of what God created on each of the six days and explain briefly how the progression of the successive creative acts were perfectly arranged.
  2. In what way is man unique from all God’s other creations?
  3. Temptation is common to man, but God has given a promise to those who serve Him. What is that promise? See 1 Corinthians 10:13.
  4. What lesson can we learn from the example of Noah and his family regarding God’s judgment?
  5. The builders of Babel failed when they disobeyed God and attempted to create their own security, and make a name for themselves. According to 1 Corinthians 3:9-15, who is the Christian’s co-laborer in building a spiritual house?
  6. Abram had an intimate relationship with God. Because of his noble character and faith in God, James 2:23 tells us he was called which one of the following: a) helper, b) friend, c) brother, or d) father of God? How might a Christian in today’s crowded environment cultivate this same relationship?
  7. Briefly describe the manner in which God called Moses. Then list the similarities and differences between Moses’ call and the call of God to individuals today.
  8. The first written Law of God is known as the Ten Commandments. God gave them so that man might live in harmony with Him and with each other. What bearing do they have upon a Christian’s life today?
  9. Sinful man needs an intercessor in order to come to God. What steps did Jesus take to become our High Priest? See Hebrews 2:17.
  10. Most people, unlike Saul, desire to be promoted in the eyes of those around them. Describe the prerequisites for spiritual success and explain where promotion comes from. Use 1 Peter 5:5-6 for a reference as well as the text for this lesson.
  11. God ordained that the children of Levi were to use the tithes for their own sustenance. What are our tithes and offerings used for in the church today? Does God’s blessing given in Malachi 3:10 still apply to us today?

INTRODUCTION
Among the definitions of the word thanksgiving are: “the act of giving thanks,” “a prayer expressing gratitude,” and “a public acknowledgment or celebration of divine goodness.” Although the word thanksgiving does not appear in Psalm 103, this Psalm is an excellent expression of heartfelt gratitude and praise to God. The more one praises and thanks God for His goodness, the more reasons he finds for doing so. To deny God genuine thanksgiving is to fail to recognize God’s wonderful bounty to each individual.
QUESTION
  1. In looking at the first verse of our text, with what part of his being did the Psalmist bless (praise) the Lord? Why? See John 4:23.
  2. Name six benefits the Psalmist listed as coming from the Lord. How do you feel about these benefits?
  3. What is likened to the eagle in verse 5? Why give thanks for this?
  4. How do the oppressed fare when they trust the Lord?
  5. List five other items, mentioned in verses 8 and 9 of our text, for which we should be thankful.
  6. What are the wages of sin (Romans 6:23)? How does the Psalmist treat this truth (verse 10)?
  7. How far does God remove the sins of those who repent? Why should this cause thanksgiving?
  8. Why does God have pity upon His children? See verses 13 and 14.
  9. In what way is the duration of life brought to our attention?
  10. In what way is the mercy of the Lord emphasized? Why should this be an inspiration for thanksgiving?

INTRODUCTION
The Lord does not need anything that man has accumulated. He owns the cattle on a thousand hills (Psalm 50:10), the silver and gold (Haggai 2:8), the earth and everything in it (Psalm 24:1). However, He expects us to be good stewards of what He permits us to acquire. From Abraham’s time on, God has blessed those who have given tithes and freewill offerings to the Lord. The tithe and certain offerings were required under the Old Testament Law of Moses. Tithing is not dwelt upon in the New Testament, but it was still approved of by Jesus. At one point, as He was giving a warning to the scribes and Pharisees, He called them hypocrites. They did tithe, but neglected more important matters like justice, mercy, and faithfulness. If the plan of tithing were to be done away with, Jesus would not have told them they should do these vital things as well as give tithes. See Matthew 23:23.
QUESTION
  1. Shortly after their deliverance from Egypt, the Children of Israel were told by God to be prompt in offering the first part of all their increase (Exodus 22:29). What do you think this meant?
  2. The first written record we have of anyone’s paying tithes was when Abram paid tithes to Melchizedek (Genesis 14:18-20). To whom do our tithes belong and why? See Leviticus 27:30.
  3. The Israelites could not give their tithes to the Lord in person, but God had a plan for the tithes. In reading Numbers 18:21, what do you feel that plan was?
  4. Since we are not Israelites with a priesthood to support, where should our tithes and offerings go?
  5. What do you think is meant by Malachi 3:8?
  6. What was God’s promise to those who did bring in their tithes?
  7. Do you think the “poor widow” mentioned in Luke 21:2 was foolish to do what she did? Give a reason for your answer.
  8. How do you relate Matthew 25:35-40 with the thought of the title of this lesson?

INTRODUCTION


This study shows clearly that God is vitally concerned about benefiting His people. When Israel persisted in their request for a king, God used circumstances to bring together the long-time prophet Samuel and a young man whose name was Saul. Despite Saul’s impressive appearance, he demonstrated qualities of humility and obedience, two characteristics necessary to be a leader of God’s people. If we possess these qualities, we will experience spiritual success and promotion from the Lord.

QUESTIONS


  1. What position did Samuel occupy in addition to being a prophet to the people of Israel? How long did he occupy this position? See 1 Samuel 7:15-17.
  2. Samuel was grieved that the Israelites had asked for a king. He felt as though he had been rejected, but, in 1 Samuel 8:7, God told Samuel this was not so. Who did God say the people had rejected, and why?
  3. Throughout 1 Samuel 8, we read that Samuel had carefully followed God’s instructions, pointing out to the Israelites the future oppression they would suffer under such kings who would require of them some of their sons and daughters and a portion of their wealth. Despite that, the people still rejected God’s council. How does Isaiah 1: 19-20 agree with Samuel’s message to the people? What did God finally instruct Samuel to do? See 1 Samuel 8:22.
  4. Circle the right answer:
    • Saul was of the tribe of … (1) Dan (2) Ephraim (3) Benjamin (4) Judah
    • He was … (1) little of stature (2) taller than others (3) a poor physical specimen
    • His father’s name was . .. (1) Abiel (2) Zeror (3) Bechorath (4) Kish
    • Saul was … (1) proud (2) humble and obedient (3) disobedient.
  5. The extent of a family’s livestock in Saul’s day was a measure of its prosperity. How did Saul respond to his father’s request to seek the lost donkeys? Was he thorough in his search? Why? See 1 Samuel 9:3-10, 20.
  6. Do you think it was coincidental that Saul, in his search for the lost donkeys, came to Samuel at the end of his third day’s search? Why or why not? See 1 Samuel 9: 15-16.
  7. Mark the following statements true or false:
    • (a) Saul had been anointed by Samuel prior to his coronation in 1 Samuel 10:24. See 1 Samuel 9:16; 10:1.
    • (b) Saul traveled with Samuel to the coronation. See 1 Samuel 10:21-22.
    • (c) God demonstrated to the Israelites the man that He had chosen to be king by directing the casting of lots (similar to drawing names). First, a tribe was chosen (Benjamin), then a family from that tribe (Matri), then a man from that family. See 1 Samuel 10:20-21.
    • (d) Saul immediately confirmed his kingdom by putting the political dissenters into prison. See 1 Samuel 10:27.
  8. God has given Christians a system of success and promotion in His service. This is very different from the system used by most individuals, corporations, or by those seeking political office today. After studying 1 Peter 5:5-6 and this lesson, comment here on how you feel God’s system differs from that of the world’s.

THEME THOUGHTS


It is not difficult to go through the Bible and compile an extensive list of first events from which we can learn valuable lessons. Most people are interested in how or when something started and who started it. This quarter will focus on beginnings. The first two lessons deal with the beginning of everything—Creation and the first man. The next two are about the first sin and the first plan of escape from God’s judgment for sin. The next lesson is about the people who built the first “skyscraper” and the pitfalls of trying to be independent from God.

Four Bible characters will be studied: the first Hebrew, Abraham; the first leader, Moses; Israel’s first priest, Aaron; and the first king of Israel, Saul. There also will be a lesson on God’s first written Law.

The point of studying these lessons is to help us get a better understanding of some of the firsts in Bible history and, more importantly, to learn that, since the beginning of our world, each of these has played an important part in Gods plan for our lives. We want to grow spiritually from what we have learned.

INTRODUCTION
God’s chosen people were the Children of Israel. His first written Law was given to them through the prophet Moses. It began with the Ten Commandments, which were later written on tables of stone by the finger of God (Exodus 31:18). All of these laws and ordinances were specific, and the people were required to know them and to teach them to their children. See Deuteronomy 6:6-9.
QUESTION
  1. When and where did God give Moses and the Children of Israel the Ten Commandments? See Exodus 19:1, 20-25.
  2. Briefly write down each of the Ten Commandments.
  3. Which of these commandments covered the people’s relationship with God? with their fellow man?
  4. What was God’s promise to the Children of Israel if they kept all His commandments? See Exodus 19:5-6 and Deuteronomy 28:1-14
  5. What did Paul the Apostle say was the first commandment with promise (Ephesians 6:2-3)? What does the phrase “with promise” signify?
  6. What was Jesus’ reply when He was asked, “which is the great commandment in the law?” See Matthew 22:36-40.
  7. What did Jesus mean, in Matthew 22:40, when He said, “On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets”?
  8. What was the reply of the rich young ruler when Jesus told him he would have eternal life if he would “keep the commandments”? How did Jesus answer him? See Matthew 19:16-22.
  9. Today we live under the New Testament covenant through Jesus Christ, and not under the Old Testament Law of Moses. Under this new covenant, where does God tell us He will put His laws? See Jeremiah 31:31-34 and Hebrews 10:16-18.

INTRODUCTION
The commission Moses received from God, to lead the Children of Israel from bondage in Egypt to the Promised Land, was a huge one. Great issues were at stake and much would depend on him. One cannot blame Moses for saying, “Who am I?” When God calls one to a position of responsibility in His service, that person may not feel sufficient. But God’s commands are His enablings; with an order there is given the required strength and wisdom. Surely there was great comfort and reassurance in the promise that God gave Moses: “Certainly I will be with thee.”
QUESTION
  1. Where was Moses when he heard the call of God? Why do you think God choose that location?
  2. God allowed some unusual circumstances to direct the course of Moses’ early life. Briefly outline those events, using Acts 7:20-29.
  3. God used a supernatural manifestation to call Moses. How does He call people today? How can we know that any call from God is just as important as His call to Moses though it may not be given in such a spectacular way?
  4. Of what importance was it to Moses when God declared Himself to be the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob?
  5. Parallel Moses’ response to how some people respond today when they feel the call of God.
  6. In verse 12 of our text, God promised Moses a token. What was that token? Does God do this for us today? Explain.
  7. In our key verse, God made three promises regarding what He will do for His people. What were they?
  8. What did God promise Moses He would do for the Children of Israel? Draw the parallel between the promise to the Israelites and the promise to Christians.
  9. Humility is an essential quality of leadership in the work of the Lord. What word is used in Numbers 12:3 to describe this quality in Moses’ life?

INTRODUCTION


God is continually looking for one who will make up the hedge and stand in the gap (Ezekiel 22:30). Often He is disappointed, but the Bible tells us of some who did respond to the call of God. Among these was Abraham. Because of his implicit faith in God, he is known as “the Friend of God” (James 2:23). Isn’t it wonderful that Jesus said we, too, can be His friend (John 15:14-15)?

QUESTION


  1. What were the promises that God made to Abram and on what were they conditioned?
  2. List some promises God has made to you and reflect on what you have to do to receive them.
  3. Of the seven promises God gave to Abram, which do you consider to be the most important to us? Why?
  4. Genesis 12:1 tells us Abram was promised a land which God would show him. Where was that land? What other verse in our text brings out God’s promise that He would give this land to Abram’s descendants?
  5. When Abram was ninety-nine years old God told him to “walk before me and be thou perfect.” Explain in your own words what this means. Why did God require this of Abram? See Genesis 17:2.
  6. In His sermon on the mount, Jesus tells us to be perfect (Matthew 5:48). How many other references to perfection can you find in the New Testament?
  7. What significance is there in the fact that God changed Abram’s name to Abraham?
  8. List some ways that Psalm 1 might apply to Abraham.
  9. It is obvious that Abraham received some wonderful benefits by following the Lord. In reading Psalm 1, we find some benefits to which we, too, have access if we follow the Lord. The first verse of this Psalm lists three contingencies. For each, give an example or illustration applicable to our day.
  10. Psalm 1:3 promises the godly man that “whatsoever he doeth shall prosper.” How can we explain this verse in light of the fact that, obviously, all Christians are not materially prosperous?

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


Psalm 1:1-6

THEME THOUGHTS


It is not difficult to go through the Bible and compile an extensive list of first events from which we can learn valuable lessons. Most people are interested in how or when something started and who started it. This quarter will focus on beginnings. The first two lessons deal with the beginning of everything—Creation and the first man. The next two are about the first sin and the first plan of escape from God’s judgment for sin. The next lesson is about the people who built the first “skyscraper” and the pitfalls of trying to be independent from God.

Four Bible characters will be studied: the first Hebrew, Abraham; the first leader, Moses; Israel’s first priest, Aaron; and the first king of Israel, Saul. There also will be a lesson on God’s first written Law.

The point of studying these lessons is to help us get a better understanding of some of the firsts in Bible history and, more importantly, to learn that, since the beginning of our world, each of these has played an important part in God’s plan for our lives. We want to grow spiritually from what we have learned.

INTRODUCTION


It is astounding that, with Noah still alive about one hundred years after the Flood, the people of the earth should so lose their fear of God that they did not hesitate to join themselves in a project defying Him. Building a tower and concentrating their population instead of spreading out and repopulating the earth as God had commanded (Genesis 9:1), demonstrated their independent spirit and resistance to God. Because of their disobedience, God intervened and confused their language, thus preventing the world from again being given over totally to sin and lawlessness. God’s Word is our blueprint for building our spiritual house. Deviation from this blueprint will result in the same confusion and disaster experienced by the people of Babel.

THEME THOUGHTS


It is not difficult to go through the Bible and compile an extensive list of first events from which we can learn valuable lessons. Most people are interested in how or when something started and who started it. This quarter will focus on beginnings. The first two lessons deal with the beginning of everything—Creation and the first man. The next two are about the first sin and the first plan of escape from God’s judgment for sin. The next lesson is about the people who built the first “skyscraper” and the pitfalls of trying to be independent from God.

Four Bible characters will be studied: the first Hebrew, Abraham; the first leader, Moses; Israel’s first priest, Aaron; and the first king of Israel, Saul. There also will be a lesson on God’s first written Law.

The point of studying these lessons is to help us get a better understanding of some of the firsts in Bible history and, more importantly, to learn that, since the beginning of our world, each of these has played an important part in Gods plan for our lives. We want to grow spiritually from what we have learned.

QUESTION


  1. Who did the people of Babel consult with as they made plans to build a city and a tower? Who should they have approached about the matter? Why?
  2. Note here two reasons why the men of Babel decided to build a city and a tower whose “top may reach unto heaven.”
  3. Who visited the people as they attempted to build the city and tower at Babel, and why? Is God interested in our plans today? Why or why not?
  4. What action did the Lord decide to take regarding the building project at Babel? Why?
  5. As Christians, we are co-laborers with God in building our spiritual house. List several things which show God’s part in this labor. List several things which show our part.
  6. In 1 Corinthians 3:12, the writer mentions various materials which one might use to build his spiritual house. Note here several Christians’ experiences and Christian character attributes which he may be referring to as “gold, silver, precious stones.” Now contrast these with what you think the writer may mean by “wood, hay, stubble.” See John 17:17; Acts 2:39; Galatians 3:2-3; 5:22-23; Hebrews 6:1; James 1:22 and 1 Peter1:5-7.
  7. Explain what you feel the word fire refers to in 1 Corinthians 3:13.
  8. How is it possible to lose the heavenly reward which we might have gained in our service for Christ? And how is it possible to be assured of that reward?

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


Isaiah 55:6-9

INTRODUCTION


Just a few generations after Adam’s sin, God saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every imagination of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually. Being grieved with this condition, God decreed judgment upon corrupt mankind, but “Noah found grace in the eyes of the Lord” and he and his family were spared from destruction. Thus we find from the beginning of God’s dealings with men that His love provides, for those who repent, a way of escape from judgment.

THEME THOUGHTS


It is not difficult to go through the Bible and compile an extensive list of first events from which we can learn valuable lessons. Most people are interested in how or when something started and who started it. This quarter will focus on beginnings. The first two lessons deal with the beginning of everything—Creation and the first man. The next two are about the first sin and the first plan of escape from God’s judgment for sin. The next lesson is about the people who built the first “skyscraper” and the pitfalls of trying to be independent from God.

Four Bible characters will be studied: the first Hebrew, Abraham; the first leader, Moses; Israel’s first priest, Aaron; and the first king of Israel, Saul. There also will be a lesson on God’s first written Law.

The point of studying these lessons is to help us get a better understanding of some of the firsts in Bible history and, more importantly, to learn that, since the beginning of our world, each of these has played an important part in Gods plan for our lives. We want to grow spiritually from what we have learned.

QUESTION


  1. Why was Noah told to build the ark, and from what source did he receive instructions to build such a vessel?
  2. Give a description of the ark. How did Noah know that it would be seaworthy, or even float?
  3. What took place as soon as Noah was finished building the ark? What space of time came between this event and the actual Flood? What significance can be placed upon this circumstance?
  4. Who shut the door when Noah and his family were in the ark? Why?
  5. Because Noah was a righteous man, he was saved from the Flood. Do you feel that God will eventually destroy the righteous with the wicked when He sends judgment upon the earth again? Why or why not?
  6. Explain how the earth will eventually be destroyed. See 2 Peter 3:10.
  7. What similarity is there between the days of Noah and the days in which we live? Matthew 24:37-39.

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


Matthew 24:37-39

INTRODUCTION


Temptation is the means by which Satan attempts to deceive mankind into disobeying God. It is the common lot of all. But a Christian who faces up to temptation and utilizes the source of his strength-the overcoming power of God-will not fall into sin as did Adam and Eve.

THEME THOUGHTS


It is not difficult to go through the Bible and compile an extensive list of first events from which we can learn valuable lessons. Most people are interested in how or when something started and who started it. This quarter will focus on beginnings. The first two lessons deal with the beginning of everything—Creation and the first man. The next two are about the first sin and the first plan of escape from God’s judgment for sin. The next lesson is about the people who built the first “skyscraper” and the pitfalls of trying to be independent from God.

Four Bible characters will be studied: the first Hebrew, Abraham; the first leader, Moses; Israel’s first priest, Aaron; and the first king of Israel, Saul. There also will be a lesson on God’s first written Law.

The point of studying these lessons is to help us get a better understanding of some of the firsts in Bible history and, more importantly, to learn that, since the beginning of our world, each of these has played an important part in God’s plan for our lives. We want to grow spiritually from what we have learned.

QUESTION


  1. What is the dictionary definition of the word tempt?
  2. Give a definition of sin.
  3. Temptation always precedes sin and yet it is obvious the two are not the same. Yielding to Satan’s temptations is what causes sin. What means did God provide for Adam and Eve to escape yielding to the temptation?
  4. How did the serpent’s question, “Yea, hath God said, Ye shall not eat of every tree of the garden?” lead into temptation?
  5. The devil promised Eve that she and Adam would be as gods, knowing good and evil. What could they gain by yielding?
  6. Sin was introduced by the first lie. What was the first lie? What are the characteristics of a lie?
  7. Using 1 John 2:16, what are the points of contact with the world that would lead us into temptation?
  8. John 17:15-16 indicates that we do not need to be taken out of the world in order to be kept from evil. List several things we can do to avoid being overcome by temptation.

Through man’s temptation and subsequent yielding, the curse of sin was brought into the world. But God offers mercy through His plan of redemption. The first promise of this is given in Genesis 3:15. On the Cross, the heel of the Savior was bruised in death, but the head of the serpent (Satan) is bruised every time a lost soul is redeemed or one of God’s redeemed withstands temptation.

 

INTRODUCTION


What a person believes about his origin greatly affects his entire philosophy of life. If a man were convinced that he does not have an eternal soul, then it would seem to him that he would have no responsibility to God for the way he lives his life. But a person’s disbelief in the Bible does not release that one from his responsibility to God. As Christians, we believe that the most important decision a man can make is the one that will affect the eternal destiny of his soul. It is imperative that we arm ourselves against those who would erode this basic belief that man was created by God in His own image and possesses a never-dying soul. We can do this by studying the Bible, God’s divine Word, with the simplicity of faith.

QUESTION


  1. When the initial part of the Creation was completed and the earth was in readiness, God performed His last creative act-He made man. Why did God make man? See Isaiah 43:7 and Revelation 4:11.
  2. How was man’s physical body created? What factor made the creation of man unique or different from all the creative acts which had already taken place?
  3. Man is distinguished from all other living creatures in that he alone possesses a living soul. How and why was man given a soul?
  4. Genesis 1:26-27 states that man was created in God’s image and likeness. What does this mean to you?
  5. Causing a deep sleep to come upon Adam, God took one of Adam’s ribs and from it created a woman. Then He brought the woman to Adam for a helpmate. Why did God feel man needed a helpmate?
  6. Read Psalm 8:4-8. What place was man given in God’s creation?
  7. What is meant by the word dominionin Genesis 1:28?
  8. How will the Christian look at God’s creations differently than the non-Christian?

Search Lesson 001

INTRODUCTION


The Bible is not only a book of beginnings, but also a book of eternities. The very supreme revelation of the Bible is the revelation of God. If one starts to think of the beginning, using his own reasoning, he will have trouble and will possibly supply a humanistic assumption for the real beginning. He would therefore substitute the creature’s point of view for the Creator’s point of view. Among many scientists, there are basic differences of opinion as to the origin of the universe. Evolutionists hold that all living things developed from non-living materials. Creationists believe that all basic categories of nature were brought into being by a supernatural force. It takes as much faith to subscribe to the theory that our complex universe is a mere chance happening as to accept the first verse of the inspired Word which declares, “In the beginning, God created the heaven and the earth.”

THEME THOUGHTS


It is not difficult to go through the Bible and compile an extensive list of first events from which we can learn valuable lessons. Most people are interested in how or when something started and who started it. This quarter will focus on beginnings. The first two lessons deal with the beginning of everything—Creation and the first man. The next two are about the first sin and the first plan of escape from God’s judgment for sin. The next lesson is about the people who built the first “skyscraper” and the pitfalls of trying to be independent from God.

Four Bible characters will be studied: the first Hebrew, Abraham; the first leader, Moses; Israel’s first priest, Aaron; and the first king of Israel, Saul. There also will be a lesson on God’s first written Law.

The point of studying these lessons is to help us get a better understanding of some of the firsts in Bible history and, more importantly, to learn that, since the beginning of our world, each of these has played an important part in Gods plan for our lives. We want to grow spiritually from what we have learned.

QUESTIONS


1. Make a list of what God created on each of the six days.
2. Many say that the days mentioned in the Creation account are actually long periods of time. What does Scripture teach about the length of these days?
3. Can man create something from nothing? Explain. See Ecclesiastes 1:9-10.
4. What scientific principle is illustrated by each of these verses?

  • Job 26:7
  • Job 26:8
  • Job 26:10
  • Ecclesiastes 1:6
  • Ecclesiastes 1:7
  • Isaiah 40:22
  • Jeremiah 33:22
  • What is meant by the statement, “after his kind,” in the creation of the plants, water creatures, fowls, and animals?
  • Make a list of ways in which we benefit from the “lights” God made for us.
  • In studying the entire first chapter of Genesis, how is the existence of the Holy Trinity demonstrated in the account of the Creation?

Though no declaration which God makes needs to be substantiated by evidence or argument, the portions of His wonderful Book that touch upon the subject of Creation still serve greatly to strengthen our faith. For example, the Psalmist proclaims, “The heavens declare the glory of God; and the firmament sheweth his handiwork. Day unto day uttereth speech, and night unto night sheweth knowledge. There is no speech nor language, where their voice is not heard” (Psalm 19: 1-3). The heavens, and the earth also, are declaring to man by innumerable evidences-by the stars, by the seas, by the mountains, by the trees-that God is the Creator of all that is.

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


Nehemiah 9:6
Hebrews 11:3

INTRODUCTION
Every day of our lives should be lived in the center of God’s will. Measuring our daily actions by the Word of God will show us whether we are drawing closer to God or moving farther away. If we daily ask God to show us His will, and then follow His will, we can be sure of God’s blessing, and that He will be honored by the outcome of our lives.

THEME THOUGHTS

Christian maturity comes as a result of taking a realistic, practical, and God-directed approach to both the opportunities and the problems of life. That is why the admonitions found in the Bible are of proven value. They apply to the everyday experiences we face.

How to gain Christian maturity is the thrust of the lessons to be studied during this quarter.

The basic point to remember in considering the precepts of this unit is that submitting to Christ as our Lord and Savior comes first. With this thought in mind, we begin the unit by focusing on the reality of Jesus’ presence with us and in us.

The second lesson deals with the subject of Christian growth, establishing that God’s Word outlines certain ways and means of spiritual development, and that spiritual growth is necessary.

With these two lessons as the foundation for the quarter, we move into a consideration of specific areas such as decision-making, resisting the devil, avoiding physical and spiritual pollution, self-discipline, and how to deal with personal problems.

Our quarter concludes with a lesson on looking at the outcome, in which we will be encouraged to see the importance of measuring our daily actions by whether these actions will draw us closer to God or move us farther away.

Our goal this quarter is to reach the point where we can say with Paul, “. . . in all these things we are more than conquerors through him that loved us” (Romans 8:37).

QUESTION

  1. According to our text in Colossians 3:17,23, what is supposed to be the motivating factor in a Christian’s life? In what manner is this to be accomplished?
  2. Any act on our part that would cause a brother to stumble spiritually or to become offended is not good. See Romans 14:21. Scripture indicates that an opposite course of action is the responsibility of the Christian, and that conduct of this kind will bring about the outcome desired by God. What is this opposite course of action? See Romans 14:19.
  3. In 1 Corinthians 6:12, we read the phrase, “All things are lawful unto me, but all things are not expedient.” The word expedient means “useful, or helpful to attain some end.” In light of this definition, how does the phrase apply to a Christian’s life?
  4. Name some ways one might be “unequally yoked together with unbelievers” (2 Corinthians 6:14). What would be the likely adverse outcome of a Christian’s putting himself into such a situation?
  5. After reading 1 Thessalonians 5:22, explain what a Christian should do about evil. Name several ways this can be accomplished.
  6. The Bible says, “Abhor that which is evil; cleave to that which is good” (Romans 12:9). Make a list of things that are evil which a Christian encounters almost daily. How should we go about avoiding the evils that have been listed?
  7. In your own words explain how James tells us to plan for tomorrow (James 4:15). Why is this important?
  8. Knowing that 2 Corinthians 5:10 is true, why is it so important to look at the outcome of our daily living?

INTRODUCTION
Without a willingness to discipline oneself, and bring thoughts and actions into conformity with the Word of God, one cannot be a disciple of Jesus. Self-discipline, then, must be practised not only by ministers and missionaries but by everyone who desires to make Heaven his home. This means more than just forsaking sin and sinful pleasures. It includes a willingness to develop oneself spiritually and to make sacrifices for the Lord and His work.

INTRODUCTION

Jesus told the parable about the nobleman who was to go away, become a king, and return. This was one of Jesus’ last teachings to His disciples, taking place just before His triumphal entry into Jerusalem, and less than a week before His crucifixion. Christ’s purpose was to educate His disciples regarding His departure to Heaven, their responsibility to carry on His work after He went away, and His eventual return. Our study will concentrate on our responsibility as Christ’s disciples to be faithful in using what He has given us for His service.

THEME THOUGHTS

Christian maturity comes as a result of taking a realistic, practical, and God-directed approach to both the opportunities and the problems of life. That is why the admonitions found in the Bible are of proven value. They apply to the everyday experiences we face.

How to gain Christian maturity is the thrust of the lessons to be studied during this quarter.

The basic point to remember in considering the precepts of this unit is that submitting to Christ as our Lord and Savior comes first. With this thought in mind, we begin the unit by focusing on the reality of Jesus’ presence with us and in us.

The second lesson deals with the subject of Christian growth, establishing that God’s Word outlines certain ways and means of spiritual development, and that spiritual growth is necessary.

With these two lessons as the foundation for the quarter, we move into a consideration of specific areas such as decision-making, resisting the devil, avoiding physical and spiritual pollution, self-discipline, and how to deal with personal problems.

Our quarter concludes with a lesson on looking at the outcome, in which we will be encouraged to see the importance of measuring our daily actions by whether these actions will draw us closer to God or move us farther away.

Our goal this quarter is to reach the point where we can say with Paul, “. . . in all these things we are more than conquerors through him that loved us” (Romans 8:37).

QUESTION

  1. The word nobleman means “person of noble blood, usually princely.” Give evidence as to whom you think the nobleman represents in this parable. See Hebrews 12:2.
  2. The word servant is translated from the Greek word doulos which can mean “slave, bondman, or servant of a king.” In the New Testament epistles, doulos often denotes “one who gives himself up wholly to another’s will, or dominion.” With these facts in mind, identify whom the servants in this parable represent.
  3. The nobleman had ten servants. Each servant was given one pound. List the various gifts or talents which you think the pounds might represent. Refer to 1 Corinthians 12:4-11,28.
  4. Paraphrase the nobleman’s statement to his ten servants, “Occupy till I come.”
  5. Who are the citizens referred to in verses 14 and 27 of our lesson? How would you support this conclusion?
  6. Verse 15 tells us that having received his kingdom and returned, the nobleman called his servants to determine how much each man had gained by trading. Describe some of the “gains” one can experience in working for the Lord.
  7. Verses 20-26 deal with the other servant and his great error. Identify this error and interpret its meaning.
  8. The nobleman, in verse 17, pronounced the servant whose pound had gained ten pounds as “faithful.” Consider and note several actions which we could take to ensure a reward in eternity as a faithful steward of Jesus Christ.

 

INTRODUCTION
Were the heroes of faith in the Bible any different from the present-day child of God? Scripture tells us in James 5:17 that Elijah was a man subject to like passions as we are. He was an example of how a Christian, even today, can react in times of stress and pressure.
QUESTION
  1. As we read the story of Elijah, what are some of the stressful situations in which he found himself? How did he handle each of them? Particularly note 1 Kings 17:1,3,7,17; 18:17-24.
  2. What did God promise Elijah when he faced Ahab after the 3-1/2 years of drought (1 Kings 18:1)? What did Elijah do when this didn’t happen immediately?
  3. What attributes were shown by the three Hebrew children when they refused to obey the king’s edict to bow down to his idol? See Daniel 3:16-18.
  4. What did Jesus do when He was falsely accused and reviled for doing good? Since He was the Son of God, do you feel the stress and pressure He went through was any less serious than what we may feel? See Hebrews 4:15 and 1 Peter 2:21-23.
  5. How do most people react when they are reproved for something and realize they may have deserved it? How do most people react if they are accused of something of which they are completely innocent? Justified or unjustified, reproof can cause stress. In what way should a Christian react to stress? See 1 Peter 2:18,20.
  6. What are some of the situations that may arise in our present-day society that can induce stress and tension in one’s life?
  7. What are some ways people have tried to combat stress in their lives, as compared with what a Christian can do?
  8. What does the Bible instruct us to do when the cares, anxieties, and pressures of life come upon us? See Matthew 6:25; Philippians 4:6-7 and 1 Peter 5:7.
  9. What kind of Christian witness are we displaying when we meet the crises and tests of life as God would have us meet them?
  10. The outcome of giving in to stress can be physical distress and in some cases a total breakdown. According to Philippians 4:7-8, there is something we can do to counteract the pressures and stresses of this life. List several stressful-type situations that might come to us and, using this Scripture, explain what you could do to lessen the stress.
INTRODUCTION
Receiving salvation is not a guarantee that the Christian will face no difficulties. In fact, the Apostle Paul exhorted early Christians to continue in the faith, cautioning them that “we must through much tribulation enter into the kingdom of God” (Acts 14:22). But for those who remain true to God, there is deliverance and an answer to every troublesome problem. In this lesson, we see how the hand of the Lord was over Joseph and moved in his behalf though he faced hard trials and personal difficulties. His story has been an example to Christians through the ages.

THEME THOUGHTS

Christian maturity comes as a result of taking a realistic, practical, and God-directed approach to both the opportunities and the problems of life. That is why the admonitions found in the Bible are of proven value. They apply to the everyday experiences we face.

How to gain Christian maturity is the thrust of the lessons to be studied during this quarter.

The basic point to remember in considering the precepts of this unit is that submitting to Christ as our Lord and Savior comes first. With this thought in mind, we begin the unit by focusing on the reality of Jesus’ presence with us and in us.

The second lesson deals with the subject of Christian growth, establishing that God’s Word outlines certain ways and means of spiritual development, and that spiritual growth is necessary.

With these two lessons as the foundation for the quarter, we move into a consideration of specific areas such as decision-making, resisting the devil, avoiding physical and spiritual pollution, self-discipline, and how to deal with personal problems.

Our quarter concludes with a lesson on looking at the outcome, in which we will be encouraged to see the importance of measuring our daily actions by whether these actions will draw us closer to God or move us farther away.

Our goal this quarter is to reach the point where we can say with Paul, “. . . in all these things we are more than conquerors through him that loved us” (Romans 8:37)

QUESTION
  1. After reading the Genesis portion of our text, list the problems that were facing Joseph at this time in his life.
  2. The problems faced by Joseph seemed to revolve, for the most part, around his relationships with other people—just as the problems facing us often do. The Scriptures give us many guidelines which direct our responses and reactions to others. Look up the following verses and note the attitudes we should maintain toward others to alleviate or minimize differences.
    • Romans 12:10
    • Romans 12:14
    • Galatians 5:14
    • Galatians 6:1
    • Colossians 3:13
  3. What was Joseph’s response when his father asked him to journey to Shechem to inquire after his brothers’ welfare? In view of the fact that his brothers hated and envied him, what was notable about Joseph’s answer and what lesson can we learn from it?
  4. In Genesis 37:15, we find Joseph facing a completely different type of problem. Identify his dif­ficulty, and explain how a solution was provided.
  5. Verses 19 and 20 reflect the contempt Joseph’s brothers felt for him. As Christians today, we must sometimes face contempt for ourselves and for our beliefs. How are we to react to this and what will occur if we follow the admonition given in Scripture? See Matthew 5:11-12 and 1 Peter 2:19-20.
  6. God, in His infinite wisdom, may allow trials to come for various reasons. Looking at Psalm 105:16-17, for what reason did Joseph have to go to Egypt?
  7. Hebrews 12:11 brings out another reason we may need to go through some times of trial and testing. Identify the reason and explain what benefit it will bring.
  8. In 1 Peter 4:19 there is a qualifying phrase which defines to whom this instruction is given. What is the phrase and why is it important?
INTRODUCTION
Paul, even though having been in prison for a long time, was not hesitant to do service for God by giving his testimony. As he stood before King Agrippa, the account of his conversion and how he answered God’s call gives us a beautiful example of a complete change, total dedication and sacrifice. We are called by the same Christ to the same Gospel. Willing service for the salvation of souls in every phase of the Lord’s work brings eternal reward.
QUESTION
  1. Paul told King Agrippa that at an earlier time in his life, his ambition had been to put the followers of Jesus into prison, see them persecuted and even put to death. His attitude had been one of anger toward the followers of Jesus. Explain what brought about the change in his attitude, and tell why you think Paul was so willing to give his testimony before the King. Refer to Acts 9.
  2. The word surrender means “to give up claim, or to yield to another.” How do you think this word relates to service for God?
  3. There are some important principles established in Scripture concerning the call of God. Read Romans 11:29 and 1 Corinthians 9:16-17, and note what points you find in these verses.
  4. Reading verse 16 in our text, we find part of Paul’s call was to “witness.” What spiritual experience will help us fulfill this part of our call? See Acts 1:8.
  5. When Jesus sent His disciples into the cities, they were told that the conditions they would face might not always be pleasant. They were sent as lambs among wolves. They were to carry no provisions. They were not guaranteed a welcome. Why were they sent? How did things turn out for them? What was their attitude upon their return to Jesus? See Luke 10:1,17 and 22:35.
  6. Willing service to God is more an attitude than an obligation. If the question is posed, “Are you willing?” what is your response? If the response is, “If I have to . . .” or “I guess I can . . . ,” the attitude is saying, “I really don’t want to.” In today’s society we are told not to commit or box ourselves in because life is too short. But this is a trick of the devil to keep us from serving the Lord. Psalm 40:8 contains a key word which reflects a certain attitude that we should maintain as we serve the Lord. Note the word, and describe how you think it applies to our Christian service. Then briefly describe how an opposite attitude might affect our service.
  7. The magnitude of needs in the spreading of the Gospel, may sometimes seem almost overwhelming. We need to be aware that our duty is not universal, but rather personal and individual. God does not command us to “Go and do everything,” but He marks out a special path for each of us. Once we have committed ourselves fully to Christ and have told Him we are willing to do whatever He gives us to do, how can we know just what that service should be? Proverbs 3:5-6 will give you some direction in noting your answer.
  8. In today’s society we often find that those in lesser circumstances are in a position of serving those who are more affluent. Matthew 23:11 establishes a Biblical perspective which is somewhat different. In your own words, elaborate on true greatness as brought out in this Scripture.
INTRODUCTION
Who should we believe? Which report is true? Who should we follow? These questions must have been heavy on the minds of the Children of Israel when they heard the conflicting reports from the twelve men who had returned from spying out the land of Canaan. Their trust in God’s promise had been overcome by doubt and fear. We, too, are faced each day with the challenge of distinguishing between right and wrong. And, many times, the consequences of wrong decisions are as grave as they were for the Children of Israel. Let’s not forget God’s promises to us.
QUESTION
  1. The history of the Children of Israel, no doubt, would read differently if the people had followed Caleb and Joshua rather than the other ten spies. Explain the reason why it makes a difference to us whom we follow in our day.
  2. It is not always easy to make the correct differentiation between truth and error, especially when the pressure is great from those around you to pursue a course other than the right one. For example, would it have been easy for you to make the right choice between the conflicting reports given by the twelve spies in our text? On what should the Children of Israel have based their decision?
  3. Ten men said Israel couldn’t take the land, while Joshua and Caleb insisted that it could be done. Because they took their stand for what was right, they were the only two of their generation who entered the Promised Land. What spiritual lesson can we learn from this?
  4. Imagine the feelings of Joshua and Caleb when they realized that the people were siding with the other ten spies. There may be situations in our lives which cause us to be uncomfortable but force us to take a stand. For example: In a high school science class, the question is asked if anyone believes in the Biblical account of creation. No one raises his hand—but you believe. Will you raise your hand? Your face turns red, your palms are sweaty, beads of perspiration are on your brow, and you raise your hand. You hear a ripple of laughter. The teacher rolls his eyes. Give another similar situation that could necessitate standing up for the Lord. Name some emotions that might accompany taking this stand, and give pos­sible reactions to it.
  5. It is important to remember scriptural promises in these times when we must take a stand. Read Philippians 4:13 and explain how this verse could help.
  6. Define the word world in the context of 1 John 2:15-17. What are the consequences of daring to be different from the world?
  7. How can we obtain the spiritual strength to take a stand for what we know is right? See Psalm 27:1 and Isaiah 40:29-31.
  8. Give a Biblical example of a person who took a stand even though opposed by those around him.