INTRODUCTION

The Theme Thoughts for this quarter brought out that even though we may feel we are just one among the millions on earth, in God’s eyes we are important. He who notes the sparrow’s fall has a perfect and precisely-detailed plan for the life of each one of us. As we look through some important points from our lessons this quarter, let’s focus on how we can find that plan and then best follow it.

THEME THOUGHTS

In this day of micro-technology, we should have no difficulty in grasping the concept that small things can be significant. We may feel that we are just one among millions on this earth, but in God’s eyes we are important; and that is the point we wish to convey throughout this quarter.

God has a plan for each of us! As we begin our Christian walk, and then continue to grow in His grace, we will want to find out what that plan is, and do our best to follow it. To discover God’s plan for us, we need to communicate with Him. With that thought is mind, this quarter opens with two lessons focusing on prayer. The lessons following those deal with recognizing the call of God and fitting ourselves to be usable in His service.

We look at the importance of witnessing to others, and the vital necessity of holding on through hard places. The quarter moves on to a series of lessons on choosing and keeping friends who will not hinder our spiritual growth. The concluding thrust is the importance of staying on the alert, ready at any moment for the Lord’s coming.

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES

 


QUESTIONS


  1. To the Christian, prayer is a required form of communication with God the Father through Jesus Christ His Son, with the aid of the Holy Spirit. Having this knowledge, how should we approach God, and what can we expect to happen as we make our requests known?
  2. God’s call to us regarding some specific service we are to do for Him may not come by dramatic revelation. We may even question whether it is really God calling us, or just our own ideas and inclinations pointing us in a certain direction. How can we be sure that what we perceive to be God’s call is really from Him? See John 7:17 and 1 Corinthians 14:32.
  3. In the Word of God we find that God has three initial experiences for the Christian. They are a foundation to prepare him for his walk of faith here on earth. Briefly explain each of these experiences and describe what they do in the life.
  4. What are some of the benefits that will come to the individual who has consecrated himself to become a part of the Body of Christ? What are the benefits that will come to the Body of Christ as a whole when all the members are working together in unity of purpose?
  5. Why is it necessary to witness to others of Christ’s redeeming grace and win souls for the Kingdom? What are the benefits of taking this initiative? See Daniel 12:3, Matthew 16:27, and Mark 16:15.
  6. Once we have committed our lives to the Lord, we can be sure the enemy of our souls will redouble his efforts to discourage, divert, or dissuade us. Our responsibility, as stewards of our souls, is to take advantage of the spiritual armor and weapons God has provided for us to defeat Satan. List some ways we can reinforce our resolve to resist the onslaughts the devil throws our way, and to keep on keeping on.
  7. Many instances of true friendship are given to us in the Bible, but the greatest friendship that ever could be experienced is that of friendship with our Lord Jesus Christ. He is a Friend to all, but what actions must we take to ensure an intimate friendship with Him? See John 15:14.
  8. God’s plan for us may, and often does, call on us to take a stand in a conspicuous way on some issue. At such times, the enemy is always there to give us a reason or reasons why going against the flow of peer pressure is perhaps not the wisest course of action. What is the responsibility of a Christian when it comes to being “different” in order to make a difference, and why?
  9. The parable of the ten virgins teaches us the vital importance of spiritual vigilance. Even though the hour was late, the wise virgins were alert and prepared for the bridegroom’s coming. What are some measures we can take to make sure we stay ready for Christ’s return?

INTRODUCTION

There are sins which are passive by nature but are as destructive in their ultimate consequences as those willfully and deliberately committed. The sin of neglect is one of these. We can see from this parable that the consequences of such sin are terrible to contemplate. Let us be as spiritually vigilant as the wise virgins were. They availed themselves of every privilege, every opportunity, and every experience that came their way.

THEME THOUGHTS

In this day of micro-technology, we should have no difficulty in grasping the concept that small things can be significant. We may feel that we are just one among millions on this earth, but in God’s eyes we are important; and that is the point we wish to convey throughout this quarter.

God has a plan for each of us! As we begin our Christian walk, and then continue to grow in His grace, we will want to find out what that plan is, and do our best to follow it. To discover God’s plan for us, we need to communicate with Him. With that thought is mind, this quarter opens with two lessons focusing on prayer. The lessons following those deal with recognizing the call of God and fitting ourselves to be usable in His service.

We look at the importance of witnessing to others, and the vital necessity of holding on through hard places. The quarter moves on to a series of lessons on choosing and keeping friends who will not hinder our spiritual growth. The concluding thrust is the importance of staying on the alert, ready at any moment for the Lord’s coming.

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


Revelation 16:15


QUESTIONS


  1. What was commendable about the attitude of both the wise and foolish virgins?
  2. In what ways, then, did the foolish virgins fail?
  3. What admonition was given to the foolish virgins? How did they react to this advice?
  4. What lessons are given to us in the conduct and attitude of the wise virgins?
  5. Who does the bridegroom represent in the parable? What does the midnight cry depict?
  6. What happened to the foolish virgins?
  7. What can we do to keep our “lamps” from going out?
  8. What thought in today’s lesson do you consider most important?

INTRODUCTION

Three young Hebrew men who served God—Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego—were asked to bow down and worship a golden image. Like, true men of faith, they refused. There were, however, some Chaldeans who observed the Hebrews’ refusal. They quickly reported the incident to the king. Now the heat was on! It was literally bow or burn. They had to choose between bowing to an idol or being true to the God of Israel.

THEME THOUGHTS

In this day of micro-technology, we should have no difficulty in grasping the concept that small things can be significant. We may feel that we are just one among millions on this earth, but in God’s eyes we are important; and that is the point we wish to convey throughout this quarter.

God has a plan for each of us! As we begin our Christian walk, and then continue to grow in His grace, we will want to find out what that plan is, and do our best to follow it. To discover God’s plan for us, we need to communicate with Him. With that thought is mind, this quarter opens with two lessons focusing on prayer. The lessons following those deal with recognizing the call of God and fitting ourselves to be usable in His service.

We look at the importance of witnessing to others, and the vital necessity of holding on through hard places. The quarter moves on to a series of lessons on choosing and keeping friends who will not hinder our spiritual growth. The concluding thrust is the importance of staying on the alert, ready at any moment for the Lord’s coming.

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


Romans 8:35-39


QUESTIONS


  1. Who are one’s peers? Who were the peers of the three Hebrew children? See Daniel 2:48-49 and 3:2-3.
  2. What is meant by the phrase harmful peer pressure? Give an example of harmful peer pressure from your own experience.
  3. How can harmful peer pressure be resisted?
  4. Is there such a thing as positive peer pressure? Explain. Give an example of positive peer pressure from your own experience.
  5. What guidelines can you use to determine whether the peer pressure you experience is positive or harmful?
  6. How can resisting harmful peer pressure help a Christian? How do you think it helped the three Hebrew children in Daniel 1?
  7. Why didn’t God deliver the three Hebrew children from going into the furnace?
  8. How is peer pressure experienced among church associates?
  9. How can one effectively accept positive peer pressure among friends?
  10. Read Daniel 3:30. The end result of resisting harmful peer pressure was a promotion for Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego. Is the end result always a promotion? Explain.

INTRODUCTION

In the account of Jonathan and David, we have one of the most beautiful examples of friendship found in the Word of God, one that lasted until Jonathan’s death and beyond. The envy, jealousies, and competitions that can so often break up friendships had no effect on them because of the godly love that existed between them.

THEME THOUGHTS

In this day of micro-technology, we should have no difficulty in grasping the concept that small things can be significant. We may feel that we are just one among millions on this earth, but in God’s eyes we are important, and that is the point we wish to convey throughout this quarter.

God has a plan for each of us! As we begin our Christian walk, and then continue to grow in His grace, we will want to find out what that plan is and do our best to follow it. To discover God’s plan for us, we need to communicate with Him. With that thought in mind, this quarter opens with two lessons focusing on prayer. The lessons following those deal with recognizing the call of God and fitting ourselves to be usable in His service.

We look at the importance of witnessing to others, and the vital necessity of holding on through hard places. The quarter moves on to a series of lessons on choosing and keeping friends who will not hinder our spiritual growth. The concluding thrust is the importance of staying on the alert, ready at any moment for the Lord’s coming.

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


1 Samuel 23:16-18; 2 Kings 2:2


QUESTIONS


  1. From a natural standpoint, what was especially unusual about the love Jonathan had for David?
  2. What was the supreme test of Jonathan’s friendship with David, and how did he retain his friendship in spite of this test? 1 Samuel 20:30-31; 23:16-17
  3. List some of the things that might come along to test a friendship. In what way would God have us react to these tests if we would keep our friendships intact?
  4. What kind of confidence did David have in the strength of his friendship with Jonathan, as Saul made attempt after attempt to take his life?
  5. What was David’s reaction to Jonathan’s death? What did he do to keep the covenant he had made with Jonathan? See 1 Samuel 20:14-17 and 2 Samuel 1:26; 9:6-10; 21:7.
  6. Several times in the Book of Proverbs, Solomon gives us instructions as to the way we should treat our friends. As Christians, what are some of the things you feel we can do to prove our love and friendship for others? See Proverbs 17:17, 18:24, and 27:10.
  7. Close friends usually enjoy the same interests, go to the same kinds of places, enjoy each other’s company, and like to talk about the same things. The prophet Malachi tells us how the Lord feels about those who channel these interests into spiritual pursuits. What has He promised those who do this? Malachi 3:16-18
  8. In 1 John 1:3,6-7, we can read of the fellowship Christians should have with another as they walk in the light of God. What is the meaning of fellowship and how can we apply it spiritually?

INTRODUCTION

The Book of Ruth relates one of the most down-to-earth examples of true friendship in the Bible. It is a story of choices and the consequences of those choices. Ruth unquestionably felt a deep kinship with her mother-in-law which caused her to forsake all that was familiar and journey to an unknown land where she became an ancestress of Christ.

THEME THOUGHTS

In this day of micro-technology, we should have no difficulty in grasping the concept that small things can be significant. We may feel that we are just one among millions on this earth, but in God’s eyes we are important, and that is the point we wish to convey throughout this quarter.

God has a plan for each of us! As we begin our Christian walk, and then continue to grow in His grace, we will want to find out what that plan is and do our best to follow it. To discover God’s plan for us, we need to communicate with Him. With that thought in mind, this quarter opens with two lessons focusing on prayer. The lessons following those deal with recognizing the call of God and fitting ourselves to be usable in His service.

We look at the importance of witnessing to others, and the vital necessity of holding on through hard places. The quarter moves on to a series of lessons on choosing and keeping friends who will not hinder our spiritual growth. The concluding thrust is the importance of staying on the alert, ready at any moment for the Lord’s coming.

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


Proverbs 14:7; 16:19; James 4:4


QUESTIONS


  1. What were some of the attributes Naomi possessed which drew Ruth to her? Ruth 1:8,20-21; 3:1,6,18
  2. Ruth made one choice, and Orpah another. Their decisions made a great difference in the future events of their lives. What took place in Ruth’s life? What very likely happened to Orpah?
  3. Consider these biblical examples of friendship, and write what influence you think each of the people had on their friend.
    • Moses and Aaron — Exodus 17:10-13
    • Joshua and Caleb — Numbers 14:6-9
    • David and Jonathan — 1 Samuel 18:3-4
    • Elijah and Elisha — 2 Kings 2:2,4,6
    • Paul and Silas — Acts 16:25
  4. What qualities should we look for in friends?
  5. Using Proverbs 18:24, how should we go about establishing friendships?
  6. An old saying, “Birds of a feather flock together,” might have had its inspiration from Proverbs 13:20. Read this verse and write how you think our associations affect what other people think of us.
  7. Why is it important to have godly standards and goals established in our own life while developing friendships?
  8. It has been said that every Christian needs a Paul, a Barnabas, and a Timothy in their lives. Paul represents the influence of an older person—a friend who can serve as a spiritual advisor or mentor. Barnabas represents friendship with a peer—someone who holds you accountable and is not afraid to “tell it like it is.” Timothy represents a younger person or a new Christian who looks to you for spiritual nurturing or example. Why is it important for a Christian to develop friendships on all three levels?

INTRODUCTION

Of greater value than the rarest of jewels in the possession of a true friend, one in whom we can place absolute trust. Everyone needs a friend—someone with a kindred spirit to share the joys and the interests of life, someone who can be relied upon for advice in times of perplexity, someone who can comfort a troubled heart in the day of grief. Jesus is that perfect Friend. When He comes into the heart, He is able to satisfy every longing of the heart and to give flawless counsel in every time of need.

THEME THOUGHTS

In this day of micro-technology, we should have no difficulty in grasping the concept that small things can be significant. We may feel that we are just one among millions on this earth, but in God’s eyes we are important, and that is the point we wish to convey throughout this quarter.

God has a plan for each of us! As we begin our Christian walk, and then continue to grow in His grace, we will want to find out what that plan is and do our best to follow it. To discover God’s plan for us, we need to communicate with Him. With that thought in mind, this quarter opens with two lessons focusing on prayer. The lessons following those deal with recognizing the call of God and fitting ourselves to be usable in His service.

We look at the importance of witnessing to others, and the vital necessity of holding on through hard places. The quarter moves on to a series of lessons on choosing and keeping friends who will not hinder our spiritual growth. The concluding thrust is the importance of staying on the alert, ready at any moment for the Lord’s coming.

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


John 13:1; Hebrews 13:5


QUESTIONS


  1. What is the dictionary definition of the word friend? Why is it necessary to have friendships?
  2. What circumstances might arise which would cause a person to change the level of friendship upon which he has placed another person? How might your answers apply to friendship with Jesus? (See Levels of Friendship chart on inside back cover of this book.)
  3. Our key verse states, “A man that hath friends must shew himself friendly.” In what manner did Jesus prove this statement true in His friendship toward us?
  4. What did Jesus mean when He said, “Henceforth I call you not servants . . . but I have called you friends”?
  5. What advantages are there in having Jesus as your best Friend?
  6. How can our relationship with Jesus be maintained?
  7. What evidence will be obvious in our lives when Jesus is our closest Friend?
  8. Many people in the world seemingly do not love Jesus at all. How then can He be their closest Friend? See Romans 5:10.

INTRODUCTION

Throughout the years, men have pondered the most profitable activity in which to engage themselves. Myriad has been the goals which they have set for themselves as the ultimate or highest possible degree of usefulness while on earth. But without doubt, the highest calling and occupation ever to thrill and hold the heart of any man is the call of God to the winning of souls for the Kingdom of Heaven. Not only does this unique call contain the greatest of earthly joys, but it also is inherent with the promise of eternal reward.

THEME THOUGHTS

In this day of micro-technology, we should have no difficulty in grasping the concept that small things can be significant. We may feel that we are just one among millions on this earth, but in God’s eyes we are important, and that is the point we wish to convey throughout this quarter.

God has a plan for each of us! As we begin our Christian walk, and then continue to grow in His grace, we will want to find out what that plan is and do our best to follow it. To discover God’s plan for us, we need to communicate with Him. With that thought in mind, this quarter opens with two lessons focusing on prayer. The lessons following those deal with recognizing the call of God and fitting ourselves to be usable in His service.

We look at the importance of witnessing to others, and the vital necessity of holding on through hard places. The quarter moves on to a series of lessons on choosing and keeping friends who will not hinder our spiritual growth. The concluding thrust is the importance of staying on the alert, ready at any moment for the Lord’s coming.

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


Job 23:10-12; Psalm 119:30-32; Isaiah 30:21


QUESTIONS


  1. What crime had the Apostles committed that brought them before the Jewish rulers? See Acts 4:1-3.
  2. The Apostles had not always been so bold. Peter had denied the Lord and others had forsaken Him and fled when He was taken by the high priest. Even after His Resurrection, they didn’t seem to promote the cause of Christ, but, instead, went fishing. What was it that compelled these men to speak out now so forcefully for Christ? See Acts 1:8.
  3. How do you suppose the authorities expected Peter and John to respond when they were commanded not to speak or teach in the name of Jesus?
  4. How did the Apostles respond when the council commanded them not to speak in the name of Jesus? Looking on into the next chapter of Acts, find where the Apostles showed by their actions that they meant what they said.
  5. In the Old Testament, we read of others who, like Peter and John, were determined to cling to God in spite of temporal and physical adversity. Briefly review the calamities that were the lot of Job. See Job 1:13-19 and 2:7. Which phrases in Job 23:8-11 prove that Job had kept his trust in God in spite of these circumstances?
  6. Read Psalm 119:30-31. What do you think is meant by the phrase, “I have stuck unto thy testimonies”?
  7. In order to keep on keeping on in our Christian walk, it is important that we know what God wants us to do. One verse that brings out the necessity of studying God’s Word is 2 Timothy 2:15. Find some other verses that bring out this thought.
  8. We pray to have our sins forgiven and to make a start in our Christian life. Why is it necessary to continue in prayer in order to keep steadfast in the way? See Matthew 26:41 and John 16:24.
  9. What part does obedience play in keeping on in our Christian walk?
  10. What good advice did Paul offer to those who want to keep on keeping on? See chapter 6 of Ephesians.

INTRODUCTION

Throughout the years, men have pondered the most profitable activity in which to engage themselves. Myriad has been the goals which they have set for themselves as the ultimate or highest possible degree of usefulness while on earth. But without doubt, the highest calling and occupation ever to thrill and hold the heart of any man is the call of God to the winning of souls for the Kingdom of Heaven. Not only does this unique call contain the greatest of earthly joys, but it also is inherent with the promise of eternal reward.

THEME THOUGHTS

In this day of micro-technology, we should have no difficulty in grasping the concept that small things can be significant. We may feel that we are just one among millions on this earth, but in God’s eyes we are important, and that is the point we wish to convey throughout this quarter.

God has a plan for each of us! As we begin our Christian walk, and then continue to grow in His grace, we will want to find out what that plan is and do our best to follow it. To discover God’s plan for us, we need to communicate with Him. With that thought in mind, this quarter opens with two lessons focusing on prayer. The lessons following those deal with recognizing the call of God and fitting ourselves to be usable in His service.

We look at the importance of witnessing to others, and the vital necessity of holding on through hard places. The quarter moves on to a series of lessons on choosing and keeping friends who will not hinder our spiritual growth. The concluding thrust is the importance of staying on the alert, ready at any moment for the Lord’s coming.

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


Matthew 9:36-38; Acts 8:4


QUESTIONS


    1. In today’s lesson, we are studying three persons as examples for witnessing. Identify the person which best fits each statement.
      • Having love and concern for the person’s enemies.
      • Having found the Messiah, he did not let the day pass until he had brought his brother to Christ.
      • This person brought one of his best friends to the Messiah.
    2. Identify the person to whom Christ ministered, who in turn spread the Good News throughout a whole city and saw many of the people believe on Him. See John 4. Note two or three reasons why this person was so successful in getting the people to come, see, and hear Jesus.
    3. What do you think was most influential in achieving the startling multiplication of members in the Early Church? See Acts 4:31; 8:4. In what way are all Christians to be “preachers of righteousness”? See Mark 16:15.
    4. When you think about speaking of Christ, how do you react? Circle one of the sentences given below or write one of your own.
      • I find it difficult to speak of such a personal matter.
      • I do not speak about Christ unless someone asks me.
      • I find it easy to talk to friends about Christ, but not to people I don’t know.
      • I find it easy to talk to strangers about Christ, but not to close friends.
      • I often find myself talking to people about Christ, and I am thrilled when I have that privilege.
    5. In your opinion, how would the Apostle Peter have answered question 4 above? Why? See Acts 4:20.
    6. Why is it so very important to witness for Jesus and win others to Him? See 2 Corinthians 5:20. Why is the Gospel vital to every person we meet from the standpoint of eternity? See Romans 6:23.
    7. Why is the Gospel important right here and now to every person we meet in the daily affairs of life? See 1 John 1:9 and Romans 8:1.
    8. What reward does those reap who witness for Christ? See Revelation 12:11 and Daniel 12:3. What happens to those who fail in this endeavor? See Mark 8:38.

 

RESOURCE MATERIAL:

 

INTRODUCTION

Just as the many members of the physical body are dependent on each other, so it is with a church. The members are united and supportive of each other. Without this union, no church could exist. God has given to each of us grace and the ability to accomplish the work He has called us to do. But to be effective for God we must consecrate our lives to do His bidding.

THEME THOUGHTS

In this day of micro-technology, we should have no difficulty in grasping the concept that small things can be significant. We may feel that we are just one among millions on this earth, but in God’s eyes we are important, and that is the point we wish to convey throughout this quarter.

God has a plan for each of us! As we begin our Christian walk, and then continue to grow in His grace, we will want to find out what that plan is and do our best to follow it. To discover God’s plan for us, we need to communicate with Him. With that thought in mind, this quarter opens with two lessons focusing on prayer. The lessons following those deal with recognizing the call of God and fitting ourselves to be usable in His service.

We look at the importance of witnessing to others, and the vital necessity of holding on through hard places. The quarter moves on to a series of lessons on choosing and keeping friends who will not hinder our spiritual growth. The concluding thrust is the importance of staying on the alert, ready at any moment for the Lord’s coming.

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


Romans 12:4-8; Ephesians 4:1-4,11-13,16


QUESTIONS


    1. What is meant by the phrase, the Body of Christ?
    2. How is the decision made to determine where one fits into the Body of Christ?
    3. What is the particular place that Christ fills in the Body? What is the responsibility of the members toward Christ?
    4. In what manner does a person develop his usefulness, and become able to accept other responsibilities as a part of the Body of Christ?
    5. What part of the Body is more important than the others, apart from the Head?
    6. What is the responsibility of each member toward the others?
    7. List some of the ways in which the Body is benefited when all the members are working together as a unit and all fit into their respective places.
    8. How does consecration help us continue to fit into the place that God has planned for us?

 

RESOURCE MATERIAL:

Tract No. 19 — A Witness of the Power of God

INTRODUCTION


The Word of God plainly teaches that God has three initial experiences for the Christian as a foundation to prepare him for his walk of faith here on earth. The first two, salvation and sanctification, are provided through the shed Blood of Jesus on Calvary (Hebrews 9:22,28; 13:12). The third, the baptism of the Holy Ghost, is a gift of God (Acts 2:38; 10:45), given to provide power for us so that we can fully serve the Lord.

THEME THOUGHTS

In this day of micro-technology, we should have no difficulty in grasping the concept that small things can be significant. We may feel that we are just one among millions on this earth, but in God’s eyes we are important, and that is the point we wish to convey throughout this quarter.

God has a plan for each of us! As we begin our Christian walk, and then continue to grow in His grace, we will want to find out what that plan is and do our best to follow it. To discover God’s plan for us, we need to communicate with Him. With that thought in mind, this quarter opens with two lessons focusing on prayer. The lessons following those deal with recognizing the call of God and fitting ourselves to be usable in His service.

We look at the importance of witnessing to others, and the vital necessity of holding on through hard places. The quarter moves on to a series of lessons on choosing and keeping friends who will not hinder our spiritual growth. The concluding thrust is the importance of staying on the alert, ready at any moment for the Lord’s coming.

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


Ephesians 6:13-17

 

QUESTIONS


    1. What proof have we from Scripture that the three basic experiences God has for a Christian—salvation, sanctification, and the baptism of the Holy Ghost—are to be sought and received in this sequence? See John 3:3; 17:17, and Acts 1:5.
    2. There are several words in use today which indicate the experience one receives when he becomes a Christian. Find Scriptures that use these expressions:
      • Born again
      • Saved
      • Converted
    3. What actions stated by Jesus in Mark 1:15 are necessary on our part in order for us to be born again, or saved from sin? Explain what these actions involve.
    4. What outward change takes place in one’s life when he or she becomes a Christian? See 2 Corinthians 5:17 and Ephesians 4:22-32.
    5. When someone comes to God to be saved, he must repent and turn from his sins. In contrast, how do we come to God when seeking to be sanctified? See Romans 12:1-2 and 6:13.
    6. What effect does the experience of sanctification have in the life of a Christian? See Romans 6:6 and Hebrews 2:11.
    7. What do Jesus’ admonitions to His disciples in Luke 24:49 and Acts 1:4,8 teach us of the importance of seeking the baptism of the Holy Ghost?
    8. Can we expect to receive the baptism of the Holy Ghost today in the same manner and with the same witness as the Early Church, or was the gift just for those in that day? Explain. See Acts 2:38-39.

RESOURCE MATERIAL:

Tract No. 30 — The New Birth

Tract No. 125 — Sanctification

Tract No. 14 — The Baptism of the Holy Ghost

 

INTRODUCTION

When Samuel answered God’s call with those beautiful words, “Speak, Lord; for thy servant heareth,” Samuel was commissioned to a life of service for God. Though still a youth, he had an ear to hear and a heart to do the bidding of the Lord. How wonderful if all would answer the call of God as readily as Samuel did, and with the same consecration and zeal in their response!

THEME THOUGHTS

In this day of micro-technology, we should have no difficulty in grasping the concept that small things can be significant. We may feel that we are just one among millions on this earth, but in God’s eyes we are important, and that is the point we wish to convey throughout this quarter.

God has a plan for each of us! As we begin our Christian walk, and then continue to grow in His grace, we will want to find out what that plan is and do our best to follow it. To discover God’s plan for us, we need to communicate with Him. With that thought in mind, this quarter opens with two lessons focusing on prayer. The lessons following those deal with recognizing the call of God and fitting ourselves to be usable in His service.

We look at the importance of witnessing to others, and the vital necessity of holding on through hard places. The quarter moves on to a series of lessons on choosing and keeping friends who will not hinder our spiritual growth. The concluding thrust is the importance of staying on the alert, ready at any moment for the Lord’s coming.

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


Matthew 4:18-22; Acts 9:3-6

 

QUESTIONS


    1. What is one thing to which God calls every man? See 1 Timothy 2:4. Why is answering this call important in order to serve the Lord?
    2. Why was Samuel ministering unto the Lord before Eli? 1 Samuel 1:11,24-28
    3. According to Scripture, Eli had neglected to do what the Lord required of him (1 Samuel 2:27-35). How did his neglect tie in with God’s instructions for Samuel?
    4. Read 1 Samuel 3:15 and describe how Samuel responded to this opportunity for service.
    5. Why do you think God calls us to His service?
    6. What are some of the things God calls people to do? How do these calls come to us?
    7. Is there a progression in the calls the Lord gives us? How do we qualify for “bigger” jobs?
    8. How can we be sure that it is God who is calling us, not just our own ideas or inclinations that are influencing our decision regarding what the Lord wants us to do? See John 7:17 and 1 Corinthians 14:32.
    9. After God calls us to something, does He ever change His mind? See Romans 11:29.

RESOURCE MATERIAL:

Tract No. 19 — A Witness of the Power of God

INTRODUCTION

Prayer is much more than a ritual to be performed at a certain hour of the day, for Jesus said that men ought always to pray and not to faint. Prayer is a vital part of the Christian’s defense. The Bible bears ample evidence that the power of Satan and evil, in general, are arrayed against those who pray to God in faith. We are living in the time just before Jesus’ coming back to earth. Only our holding on in prayer will help us to be ready for His return.

THEME THOUGHTS

In this day of micro-technology, we should have no difficulty in grasping the concept that small things can be significant. We may feel that we are just one among millions on this earth, but in God’s eyes we are important, and that is the point we wish to convey throughout this quarter.

God has a plan for each of us! As we begin our Christian walk, and then continue to grow in His grace, we will want to find out what that plan is and do our best to follow it. To discover God’s plan for us, we need to communicate with Him. With that thought in mind, this quarter opens with two lessons focusing on prayer. The lessons following those deal with recognizing the call of God and fitting ourselves to be usable in His service.

We look at the importance of witnessing to others, and the vital necessity of holding on through hard places. The quarter moves on to a series of lessons on choosing and keeping friends who will not hinder our spiritual growth. The concluding thrust is the importance of staying on the alert, ready at any moment for the Lord’s coming.

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


1 Chronicles 16:11; Matthew 26:41; Ephesians 6:18

 

QUESTIONS


    1. Manasseh is considered one of the most wicked kings in biblical history. He built altars to Baal, worshiped the host of heaven, built altars for them in the house of the Lord, caused his son to pass through the fire, and dealt in witchcraft (2 Kings 21:1-9). Yet when affliction came his way, he humbled himself and prayed to God. What was the result of Manasseh’s action? See 2 Chronicles 33:10-16.
    2. Of all the prayers that can be prayed, surely the prayer for salvation from sin is the most important. Describe the miraculous results that follow a sinner’s sincere prayer of repentance. See 2 Corinthians 5:17.
    3. While it is extremely important to repent and pray for forgiveness, list some other things that might be obtained through prayer. Then write about someone you know personally who had an answer to a prayer for one of the items on your list.
    4. Name some Bible characters who had definite answers to their prayers and tell what the answers were.
    5. In our text, Jesus gave us two important conditions to successful prayer. What are those conditions?
    6. During Elijah’s ministry, why did the rain stop falling? See 1 Kings 17:1 and James 5:17.
    7. Having already received God’s promise of rain, and even after telling Ahab, “there is a sound of abundance of rain,” why did Elijah go to the top of Mount Carmel? Relate what happened there, and describe Elijah’s reaction.
    8. Perseverance in prayer is important, but what other matter must be kept in mind and heart in order to be successful? See James 4:15.
    9. If God didn’t answer prayer in this age in which we live, what would be our hope of eternal life?

 

RESOURCE MATERIAL:

Tract No. 36 — Prayer: Communication With God

INTRODUCTION


Tears, death, sorrow, crying, and pain will soon be a thing of the past for some, “for the former things are passed away . . . Behold, I make all things new.” The new will be a glorious state of blessedness reserved for those who have had their names written in the Book of Life.

THEME THOUGHTS


It has been the aim of Satan since the beginning of time to bring all humanity into his ranks. Ever since the downfall of man in the Garden of Eden, the fight of right against wrong has been raging in this world. But God has made ample provision for the salvation of man’s immortal soul.

It is this provision that will be taken up in this study of “God’s Cure for Sin.” In Genesis 3:15 we see the first beam of light for lost humanity pointing toward Christ, the Redeemer of man. A key lesson in this quarter deals with God offering His own Son as a substitute for mankind.

Woven into this quarter are lessons covering the events leading up to Easter. We will explore the message and hope of the Resurrection as the foundation of the Gospel, and will learn how one can be enabled to walk in newness of life. We will also study some of the results of salvation and the benefits it brings into one’s life.

May God bless you as you explore His plan for the redemption of man.

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


Revelation 3:5; 20:12-15; 22:19

QUESTION


  1. What type of people will not enter into the City described in our text? Be specific, supporting your answer with Scripture.
  2. Explain what the Book of Life contains (Revelation 3:5). Of what importance is the Book of Life?
  3. Read Revelation 21:3-4. Who are the people in these verses?
  4. The Book of Life is not the only book John saw (Revelation 20:12). What do you think is found in the other books?
  5. Why is the Book of Life sometimes called “The Lamb’s Book”?
  6. What is the alternative to the Book of Life?
  7. Once your name is written down, can it ever be removed? See Exodus 32:33.
  8. What can a person do to ensure that his name will remain in the Book of Life?
  9. Read Revelation 22:18-19. What does it mean to you?
  10. From the text, list some of the things you can look forward to if you keep your name in the Lamb’s Book of Life.

REFERENCE MATERIALS


Tract No. 30 — The New Birth

INTRODUCTION


The love of a godly mother for her children is one of the greatest loves a human can experience. A young child looks to his mother for care, comfort, security, and love. As that child grows older, he honors her integrity, example, and resourcefulness. A godly mother is prayerful, self-sacrificing, and dedicated to her family. The Bible speaks of her as a virtuous woman.

THEME THOUGHTS


It has been the aim of Satan since the beginning of time to bring all humanity into his ranks. Ever since the downfall of man in the Garden of Eden, the fight of right against wrong has been raging in this world. But God has made ample provision for the salvation of man’s immortal soul.

It is this provision that will be taken up in this study of “God’s Cure for Sin.” In Genesis 3:15 we see the first beam of light for lost humanity pointing toward Christ, the Redeemer of man. A key lesson in this quarter deals with God offering His own Son as a substitute for mankind.

Woven into this quarter are lessons covering the events leading up to Easter. We will explore the message and hope of the Resurrection as the foundation of the Gospel, and will learn how one can be enabled to walk in newness of life. We will also study some of the results of salvation and the benefits it brings into one’s life.

May God bless you as you explore His plan for the redemption of man.

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


Joshua 24:14-15; Proverbs 22:6; 2 Timothy 1:1-5

QUESTION


  1. What was the nationality of the woman who came to Jesus (Mark 7:26)? What was His statement (in our text) concerning this?
  2. What spiritual virtues did the woman exhibit in coming to Jesus for physical healing for her daughter?
  3. Why do you feel Jesus acted as He did toward the woman? How might you have reacted if Jesus had shown such a seemingly unconcerned attitude toward your need?
  4. We have many beautiful accounts in the Bible which depict a mother’s love. How do you think these mothers felt in a time of emotional stress?
    • Moses’ mother, as she put her son into the basket in the river — Exodus 2:3
    • Hannah, as she left her son with Eli — 1 Samuel 1:24-28
    • Mary, as she watched Jesus hang on the cross — John 19:25
  5. Christ is our example. What kind of concern and care did He show toward His mother? See Luke 2:51 and John 19:26-27.
  6. Tell of some ways our mothers show their love for us without words. How can we reciprocate?
  7. What is the highest spiritual responsibility a mother and father have toward their children? See Deuteronomy 6:5-7.
  8. Read 2 Kings 4:1-7. In what manner does this account show us how a mother’s love for her sons brought physical help through spiritual means?

INTRODUCTION


We exercised the power of choice when we sought forgiveness for sins, and were born into the family of God. The same choice must be maintained daily if we are to remain “sons of God, without rebuke, in the midst of a crooked and perverse nation, among whom ye shine as lights in the world” (Philippians 2:15). That choice was—and remains—the choice to love the things of God in place of loving the things of the world by an ever closer companionship with Jesus Christ. John 3:31 says, “He that cometh from above is above all: he that is of the earth is earthly, and speaketh of the earth: he that cometh from heaven is above all.”

THEME THOUGHTS


It has been the aim of Satan since the beginning of time to bring all humanity into his ranks. Ever since the downfall of man in the Garden of Eden, the fight of right against wrong has been raging in this world. But God has made ample provision for the salvation of man’s immortal soul.

It is this provision that will be taken up in this study of “God’s Cure for Sin.” In Genesis 3:15 we see the first beam of light for lost humanity pointing toward Christ, the Redeemer of man. A key lesson in this quarter deals with God offering His own Son as a substitute for mankind.

Woven into this quarter are lessons covering the events leading up to Easter. We will explore the message and hope of the Resurrection as the foundation of the Gospel, and will learn how one can be enabled to walk in newness of life. We will also study some of the results of salvation and the benefits it brings into one’s life.

May God bless you as you explore His plan for the redemption of man.

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


Matthew 22:37-40; 2 Corinthians 6:17-18; Ephesians 4:1-3

QUESTION


  1. What is meant by “present your bodies a living sacrifice”?
  2. What is meant by “holy, acceptable unto God”?
  3. Why should the control of worldly pursuits be considered as a “reasonable service”?
  4. What is meant by “be not conformed to this world”?
  5. How do Christians renew their minds? See Philippians 4:8.
  6. As Christians, we want to bring our lives under the control of Christ. From Romans 12:2, what are three things we could ask ourselves about our plans as criteria for establishing whether God is really in control of our lives and plans?
  7. As we continue the thought of Christian maintenance, how does the phrase, “See that none render evil for evil unto any man,” apply?
  8. Why can the Christian give thanks in everything (Romans 8:28)? Explain why this is important in the light of maintaining our Christian testimony.
  9. What does it mean to “abstain from all appearance of evil”?
  10. Explain why a person cannot love the things of the world and love God at the same time. See Matthew 6:24.
  11. Explain 1 John 2:17 in your own words.

INTRODUCTION


In his letter to the Galatians, Paul shows that since the time of Christ’s death no rites or ceremonies of the Jewish Law or any of man’s own works can avail in the justification of a sinner. Jesus Christ is our only means of salvation (Acts 4:10-12). The fruit of the Spirit becomes evident in our lives when we are saved, and grows as we continue to live and walk in the Spirit.

THEME THOUGHTS


It has been the aim of Satan since the beginning of time to bring all humanity into his ranks. Ever since the downfall of man in the Garden of Eden, the fight of right against wrong has been raging in this world. But God has made ample provision for the salvation of man’s immortal soul.

It is this provision that will be taken up in this study of “God’s Cure for Sin.” In Genesis 3:15 we see the first beam of light for lost humanity pointing toward Christ, the Redeemer of man. A key lesson in this quarter deals with God offering His own Son as a substitute for mankind.

Woven into this quarter are lessons covering the events leading up to Easter. We will explore the message and hope of the Resurrection as the foundation of the Gospel, and will learn how one can be enabled to walk in newness of life. We will also study some of the results of salvation and the benefits it brings into one’s life.

May God bless you as you explore His plan for the redemption of man.

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


Psalm 1:1-6; 1 Corinthians 13; 2 Peter 1:4-8

QUESTION


1.Why do you think the nine virtues listed in our lesson are referred to as “the fruit” and not “the fruits”?

2.Explain why the flesh must be crucified if we are to be fruit-bearing Christians.

3.What do the nine virtues of the Spirit have in common?

4.List the fruit of the Spirit. Then name some benefits that Christians enjoy from having each of these virtues in their lives.

5.Why can a Christian still feel peace when things go wrong?

6.Describe an incident in which the fruit of the Spirit really proved to be a benefit to the one who exhibited a specific virtue.

7.How can the fruit of a tree be used to determine the worth of the tree that is bearing it? See Matthew 7:16-18.

8.Self-image is an important concept in our society. Distinguish between self-improvement and the fruit of the Spirit.

9.How can you be sure you have the fruit of the Spirit in your life?

INTRODUCTION


Because of the original sin of Adam and Eve, we are unable (without Christ) to live without sinning against God and against our fellowman. The Bible says, “The heart is deceitful above all things, and desperately wicked” (Jeremiah 17:9). “All have sinned, and come short of the glory of God” (Romans 3:23). However, the Bible has outlined certain steps that a person may take in order to have his sins forgiven. If we follow these steps carefully, acknowledging Christ as the Son of God with power to forgive and keep us from sin, honestly inviting Him to be Lord of our lives, a miracle happens. We become a brand-new person in Christ Jesus, as expressed in our key verse.

THEME THOUGHTS


It has been the aim of Satan since the beginning of time to bring all humanity into his ranks. Ever since the downfall of man in the Garden of Eden, the fight of right against wrong has been raging in this world. But God has made ample provision for the salvation of man’s immortal soul.

It is this provision that will be taken up in this study of “God’s Cure for Sin.” In Genesis 3:15 we see the first beam of light for lost humanity pointing toward Christ, the Redeemer of man. A key lesson in this quarter deals with God offering His own Son as a substitute for mankind.

Woven into this quarter are lessons covering the events leading up to Easter. We will explore the message and hope of the Resurrection as the foundation of the Gospel, and will learn how one can be enabled to walk in newness of life. We will also study some of the results of salvation and the benefits it brings into one’s life.

May God bless you as you explore His plan for the redemption of man.

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


1 Samuel 10:9; Romans 3:23; 1 John 3:9; 5:4-5

REFERENCE MATERIALS


Tract No. 30 — The New Birth

QUESTION


  1. What kind of person was Nicodemus? Why did he come to Jesus by night?
  2. Why would the working of miracles attract a person to Christ?
  3. Explain in your own words what Jesus told Nicodemus.
  4. Why is there no exception to the necessity for the new birth? What about “good” people?
  5. Once a person is born again, how is it possible for him to live each day without sinning against God? See 1 John 3:9; 5:4-5,18.
  6. Jesus healed a man at the pool of Bethesda and gave him a special command. What was this command (John 5:14)? What explicit directions did Jesus give to the woman taken in adultery, whom He forgave (John 8:11)? What significance must be placed upon these instructions?
  7. List the works of the flesh, of which a Christian will not be guilty (Galatians 5:19-21). Which part of the key verse applies to these things?
  8. When “old” things pass away, what are some of the “new” things that come into our lives?
  9. Review John 3:16; Romans 5:1; 8:1 and 12:2, and list some additional results of being born again.

INTRODUCTION


There are few, indeed, who are called from a sinful life who do not have restitutions to make. Some would tell us that when we are saved, God forgives our past and we can forget it. However, Scripture reveals that if we have in any way wronged our fellowman, God expects us to make this right. His Spirit will surely bring to mind the things for which we need to make amends. Restitution covers not only repayment of what may have been taken of monetary value, but also making right such things as lying, cheating, backbiting, and hatred.

THEME THOUGHTS


It has been the aim of Satan since the beginning of time to bring all humanity into his ranks. Ever since the downfall of man in the Garden of Eden, the fight of right against wrong has been raging in this world. But God has made ample provision for the salvation of man’s immortal soul.

It is this provision that will be taken up in this study of “God’s Cure for Sin.” In Genesis 3:15 we see the first beam of light for lost humanity pointing toward Christ, the Redeemer of man. A key lesson in this quarter deals with God offering His own Son as a substitute for mankind.

Woven into this quarter are lessons covering the events leading up to Easter. We will explore the message and hope of the Resurrection as the foundation of the Gospel, and will learn how one can be enabled to walk in newness of life. We will also study some of the results of salvation and the benefits it brings into one’s life.

May God bless you as you explore His plan for the redemption of man.

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


Leviticus 6:2-7; Numbers 5:6-8

QUESTION


  1. Why do you think the Spirit of God inspired Luke to include the story of Zacchaeus? Surely there were many more dramatic incidents that could have been recorded.
  2. Zacchaeus was a chief among the publicans (tax collectors) for the Roman government. Such men were usually Romans, but Zacchaeus, who was a Jew, probably represented the Jews in Jericho. As chief, he would have been the one who sold the privilege of collecting taxes to the highest bidders. In turn, these men could add as much of a commission as they could collect. Zacchaeus no doubt started his career as one of these tax collectors, and was not held in any regard by the Jews. Which verse in our text establishes the fact that Zacchaeus’ poor reputation was known by those in Jericho?
  3. What was required of a person bringing a trespass offering under the Mosaic Law? See Leviticus 6:2-7.
  4. Restitution obviously played an important part in obtaining forgiveness under the Mosaic Law. What part does it have in obtaining forgiveness in our time?
  5. Explain in your own words the meaning of the key verse.
  6. What evidence do we have that Zacchaeus, in his heart, met the required conditions spoken of in the key verse?
  7. Why is it as important to make a small restitution as it is a large one?
  8. What happens if we refuse to make a restitution?
  9. What are some of the benefits that might be received as a result of making a restitution?

REFERENCE MATERIALS


Tract No. 68 — Restitution

INTRODUCTION


The Bible tells us that “All have sinned, and come short of the glory of God.” No one can go to Heaven who has not been cleansed from his sins. But before one can receive salvation and forgiveness, he must first repent of those sins he has committed.

THEME THOUGHTS


It has been the aim of Satan since the beginning of time to bring all humanity into his ranks. Ever since the downfall of man in the Garden of Eden, the fight of right against wrong has been raging in this world. But God has made ample provision for the salvation of man’s immortal soul.

It is this provision that will be taken up in this study of “God’s Cure for Sin.” In Genesis 3:15 we see the first beam of light for lost humanity pointing toward Christ, the Redeemer of man. A key lesson in this quarter deals with God offering His own Son as a substitute for mankind.

Woven into this quarter are lessons covering the events leading up to Easter. We will explore the message and hope of the Resurrection as the foundation of the Gospel, and will learn how one can be enabled to walk in newness of life. We will also study some of the results of salvation and the benefits it brings into one’s life.

May God bless you as you explore His plan for the redemption of man.

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


Isaiah 53:6; Romans 8:1-16

QUESTION


  1. What does repent mean?
  2. What is necessary before a person can repent?
  3. Why might the statement, “I believe on the Lord Jesus Christ,” be insufficient to bring about salvation?
  4. Which words in the following verses indicate that repentance takes action?
    • Isaiah 1:18
    • Ezekiel 18:31
    • Hosea 14:2
    • Joel 2:12
  5. What are the eternal consequences of the statement of Jesus, “Except ye repent, ye shall all likewise perish”?
  6. Many people attempt to justify the fact that they have sins which are unrepented of by saying their sins are not serious enough to require repentance. Why is this false?
  7. How much does it cost a person to receive salvation?
  8. How can you know you are saved?

INTRODUCTION


The Gospels tell us of a number of occasions when Jesus prayed. Our communion with God is no less important. Christ gave His disciples what is now known as the Lord’s Prayer, thus teaching them that their discipleship depended on their communication with God the Father. As we study Christ’s example and instruction of how to pray contained in the Lord’s Prayer, we will seek to identify those attitudes required for true communication with God. Such communication is no less essential today if we would live for Jesus.

THEME THOUGHTS


In this day of micro-technology, we should have no difficulty in grasping the concept that small things can be significant. We may feel that we are just one among millions on this earth, but in God’s eyes we are important; and that is the point we wish to convey throughout this quarter.

God has a plan for each of us! As we begin our Christian walk, and then continue to grow in His grace, we will want to find out what that plan is, and do our best to follow it. To discover God’s plan for us, we need to communicate with Him. With that thought is mind, this quarter opens with two lessons focusing on prayer. The lessons following those deal with recognizing the call of God and fitting ourselves to be usable in His service.

We look at the importance of witnessing to others, and the vital necessity of holding on through hard places. The quarter moves on to a series of lessons on choosing and keeping friends who will not hinder our spiritual growth. The concluding thrust is the importance of staying on the alert, ready at any moment for the Lord’s coming.

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


1 Chronicles 16:11; Matthew 26:41; Ephesians 6:18

QUESTION


1.In your own words, define prayer.

2.When two friends communicate well, what is the result? Make a spiritual application.

3.Christ began the Lord’s Prayer with the words, “Our Father which art in heaven.” What do these words imply regarding our relationship with Him?

4.In reference to the phrase, “Hallowed be thy name,” define the word hallow. What attitude is evidenced by the use of this phrase, and why should this attitude be evidenced in our prayers?

5.Verse 10 includes the words, “Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven.” If these words are said sincerely, they reflect a spirit of submission. What are some of the specific areas which would then be submitted to the will of God?

6.The phrase, “Give us this day our daily bread,” indicates a feeling of dependence upon God. Name some other things for which we depend upon God.

7.What two thoughts are brought out by the phrase, “Forgive us our debts [trespasses], as we forgive our debtors [those who trespass against us]”?

8.Explain in your own words what is meant by the phrase, “And lead us not into temptation.”

9.What attitude toward God is reflected in the concluding words of the prayer?

INTRODUCTION


In this quarter, we studied God’s remedy for sin. It began with the story of how God provided a lamb as a substitute for Abraham’s son Isaac. That pointed to the Lamb of God who was our substitute on Mt. Calvary. We learned of the protection afforded by the Blood of the Lamb, what must be done to be under this protection, and what we must do to maintain it. We also learned of some of the blessings that are ours if we follow the Lord, and where our names are recorded when we give our hearts and lives to God.

THEME THOUGHTS


It has been the aim of Satan since the beginning of time to bring all humanity into his ranks. Ever since the downfall of man in the Garden of Eden, the fight of right against wrong has been raging in this world. But God has made ample provision for the salvation of man’s immortal soul.

It is this provision that will be taken up in this study of “God’s Cure for Sin.” In Genesis 3:15 we see the first beam of light for lost humanity pointing toward Christ, the Redeemer of man. A key lesson in this quarter deals with God offering His own Son as a substitute for mankind.

Woven into this quarter are lessons covering the events leading up to Easter. We will explore the message and hope of the Resurrection as the foundation of the Gospel, and will learn how one can be enabled to walk in newness of life. We will also study some of the results of salvation and the benefits it brings into one’s life.

May God bless you as you explore His plan for the redemption of man.

QUESTION


  1. What great truth is portrayed in the story of Abraham’s taking Isaac to Mt. Moriah for a sacrifice?
  2. What did God require the Children of Israel to do to protect their firstborn from death during one of the plagues in Egypt? What must man do today to escape the coming judgment?
  3. Explain the difference between the Feast of the Passover and the Lord’s Supper.
  4. Make a list of the many things Jesus suffered for our sake, and explain why He willingly went through them.
  5. Tell in your own words what happened on the Resurrection morning and what that means to us.
  6. What does it mean to repent and why is it so important?
  7. Jesus told Nicodemus that he must be born again. Explain in your own words what that means and how it affects one’s life.
  8. What does restitution mean, and why is it important?
  9. How many virtues does Paul list which make up the fruit of the Spirit? Which do you think would be unnecessary?
  10. Explain what you think it means to “Love not the world, neither the things that are in the world.”
  11. How did the Syrophenician woman show how much she cared for her daughter?
  12. Will everyone’s name be found in the Lamb’s Book of Life? What must a person do to have his name written there?

INTRODUCTION


Jesus had been crucified, had died, and had been buried in a garden tomb. The hopes of His followers had been shattered. Then on the third day, when the women went to the sepulcher to anoint His body with spices, they found the tomb was empty. An angel in white announced the glorious news, “He is not here: for he is risen, as he said” (Matthew 28:6).

THEME THOUGHTS


It has been the aim of Satan since the beginning of time to bring all humanity into his ranks. Ever since the downfall of man in the Garden of Eden, the fight of right against wrong has been raging in this world. But God has made ample provision for the salvation of man’s immortal soul.

It is this provision that will be taken up in this study of “God’s Cure for Sin.” In Genesis 3:15 we see the first beam of light for lost humanity pointing toward Christ, the Redeemer of man. A key lesson in this quarter deals with God offering His own Son as a substitute for mankind.

Woven into this quarter are lessons covering the events leading up to Easter. We will explore the message and hope of the Resurrection as the foundation of the Gospel, and will learn how one can be enabled to walk in newness of life. We will also study some of the results of salvation and the benefits it brings into one’s life.

May God bless you as you explore His plan for the redemption of man.

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


Matthew 28:1-15; Mark 16:1-11; Luke 24:1-9

QUESTION


  1. Was it necessary for the stone to be rolled away from the tomb in order for Jesus to come forth? Explain, using John 20:19 as a reference. If not, then why did the angel come down from Heaven to roll back the stone?
  2. Using Matthew 27:66 and 28:2,4, describe how the visible effects of the Resurrection showed that Jesus was victor over the efforts of the chief priests, the Roman government, and nature.
  3. What particular point of the Easter story does Mark 15:43-46 and John 19:31-34 establish? How does John 20:20 prove that He rose from the dead?
  4. What is the great importance of the Resurrection of Christ to the Christian and the Church today?
  5. To whom did Jesus first personally appear after His resurrection? Who else saw Him alive that first day? See Mark 16:12; Luke 24:13-18,34 and John 20:19.
  6. Using the following Scriptures, what were the different reactions of those who were told of His resurrection?
    • Matthew 28:8
    • Matthew 28:9; John 20:16
    • Matthew 28:11-15
    • Mark 16:11; Luke 24:11; John 20:25
    • Luke 24:12
    • Luke 24:22-23
    • John 20:8
  7. What had Jesus done to prepare His disciples for the shock of His death and resurrection? See Matthew 16:21; Mark 9:9-10 and Luke 9:21-22; 24:6-8,44.
  8. In considering the events of the first Easter, what do we have today that helps us to believe that Jesus is alive? See John 20:31. What might we conclude with regard to our responsibility to believe?

INTRODUCTION


God has instructed the Jews to keep the Passover once a year as a memorial of their exodus from Egypt and bondage. Just prior to His crucifixion, Jesus and His disciples were celebrating this feast. At the close of the Passover Supper, Jesus instituted what we know today as the Lord’s Supper. Though there is no saving grace in the ordinance itself, it depicts the total work of Christ in man’s behalf. The Lord’s Supper symbolizes the death of Jesus for our sins, and our death to sin through Him. It reminds us that Jesus’ death is the means of our righteousness, the union between Jesus and us, and our expectant hope in Christ until He comes.

THEME THOUGHTS


It has been the aim of Satan since the beginning of time to bring all humanity into his ranks. Ever since the downfall of man in the Garden of Eden, the fight of right against wrong has been raging in this world. But God has made ample provision for the salvation of man’s immortal soul.

It is this provision that will be taken up in this study of “God’s Cure for Sin.” In Genesis 3:15 we see the first beam of light for lost humanity pointing toward Christ, the Redeemer of man. A key lesson in this quarter deals with God offering His own Son as a substitute for mankind.

Woven into this quarter are lessons covering the events leading up to Easter. We will explore the message and hope of the Resurrection as the foundation of the Gospel, and will learn how one can be enabled to walk in newness of life. We will also study some of the results of salvation and the benefits it brings into one’s life.

May God bless you as you explore His plan for the redemption of man.

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


Mark 14:22-25

REFERENCE MATERIALS


Tract No. 49 — The Atoning Blood

Tract No. 69 — Ordinances

QUESTION


  1. Explain what the Passover was and to what it pointed. See Exodus 12:3-14,22.
  2. To what does the observance of the Lord’s Supper point?
  3. Why did Jesus institute this ordinance? See 1 Corinthians 11:24-26.
  4. What did they partake of at the first Lord’s Supper? What did these represent?
  5. Who was present at the first Lord’s Supper? Knowing this, explain who is to partake of the Lord’s Supper today.
  6. Define what is meant by the word unworthily in 1 Corinthians 11:27. Then explain what it means for a man to examine himself (verse 28).
  7. Referring to 1 Corinthians 11:29, explain what you think it means to discern the Lord’s body.
  8. Tell of an instance of blessing in your life, or another’s, received while you were participating in this ordinance.

INTRODUCTION


The Roman punishment of crucifixion has been considered one of the most cruel forms of death. It was a penalty for slaves, criminals, and persons who were not Roman citizens. Jesus “. . . made himself of no reputation, and took upon him the form of a servant, and . . . he humbled himself, and became obedient unto death, even the death of the cross” (Philippians 2:7-8).

THEME THOUGHTS


It has been the aim of Satan since the beginning of time to bring all humanity into his ranks. Ever since the downfall of man in the Garden of Eden, the fight of right against wrong has been raging in this world. But God has made ample provision for the salvation of man’s immortal soul.

It is this provision that will be taken up in this study of “God’s Cure for Sin.” In Genesis 3:15 we see the first beam of light for lost humanity pointing toward Christ, the Redeemer of man. A key lesson in this quarter deals with God offering His own Son as a substitute for mankind.

Woven into this quarter are lessons covering the events leading up to Easter. We will explore the message and hope of the Resurrection as the foundation of the Gospel, and will learn how one can be enabled to walk in newness of life. We will also study some of the results of salvation and the benefits it brings into one’s life.

May God bless you as you explore His plan for the redemption of man.

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


Isaiah 53:1-12; Matthew 27:27-56

QUESTION


  1. In our text, one can find the fulfilment of many Old Testament prophecies regarding Jesus’ suffering. Following each Scripture below list the prophecy and the verse or verses in John 19 where it is fulfilled.
    • Isaiah 53:3
    • Isaiah 53:7
    • Psalm 22:18
    • Psalm 69:21
    • Psalm 34:20
    • Zechariah 12:10
  2. Jesus suffered greatly during his last 24 hours on earth. In what ways was He physically abused? List as many as you can find. In addition to the text, use Isaiah 50:6; Matthew 26:67; Mark 14:65; 15:19.
  3. In what ways did Jesus mentally or emotionally suffer in those last hours? To supplement the text, see Mark 14:43-44,55-57,71; 15:34; Luke 22:44 and John 1:11.
  4. Why do you think it was necessary for Jesus to suffer so?
  5. In what ways have Christians suffered physically through the centuries because of their love for Jesus? How does this compare to Christ’s suffering?
  6. In what ways do Christians face mental or emotional suffering?
  7. At one point Jesus cried, “My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?” (Mark 15:34). Had God forsaken Jesus? Explain.
  8. By His death, Jesus made certain provisions for us. The following Scriptures give some of these provisions. List them here.
    • Titus 2:14
    • 1 Peter 2:24
    • Hebrews 13:12

INTRODUCTION


The forefathers of the Children of Israel had offered sacrifices from the beginning of sacred history. When bringing judgment on the people of Egypt, God once more revealed to the Israelites the importance of the blood of sacrifices when applied as He required. Today we must have the Blood of Jesus applied to our hearts if we expect to escape the consequences of sin.

THEME THOUGHTS


It has been the aim of Satan since the beginning of time to bring all humanity into his ranks. Ever since the downfall of man in the Garden of Eden, the fight of right against wrong has been raging in this world. But God has made ample provision for the salvation of man’s immortal soul.

It is this provision that will be taken up in this study of “God’s Cure for Sin.” In Genesis 3:15 we see the first beam of light for lost humanity pointing toward Christ, the Redeemer of man. A key lesson in this quarter deals with God offering His own Son as a substitute for mankind.

Woven into this quarter are lessons covering the events leading up to Easter. We will explore the message and hope of the Resurrection as the foundation of the Gospel, and will learn how one can be enabled to walk in newness of life. We will also study some of the results of salvation and the benefits it brings into one’s life.

May God bless you as you explore His plan for the redemption of man.

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


Joshua 2:1-22; Hebrews 9:13-15

QUESTION


  1. Who gave the instructions to God’s people for preparing the Passover lamb? What can we conclude regarding God’s plan for spiritual authority? See Ephesians 4:11-13.
  2. Why were the Israelites instructed to sacrifice a lamb without blemish? What special significance does this portray? See Hebrews 9:12-14 and 1 Peter 1:18-19.
  3. What was to be done with the blood of the lamb?
  4. List some of the ways in which the Passover lamb was a type of Christ.
  5. Why was it necessary for the Israelites to eat this first Passover feast in haste?
  6. What was the final judgment God sent upon the Egyptians, and why? See Exodus 11:1,5.
  7. The Israelites had to take some action to escape God’s judgment. What action must people take today if they expect to escape the judgment of God on this world? See Romans 3:23; Acts 17:30; John 3:16 and 8:31.
  8. The Israelites were instructed to keep the Passover as a memorial forever. At Jesus’ last Passover supper, He instituted something which Christians today do in remembrance of their Passover Lamb. What is it called and what does it commemorate? See 1 Corinthians 5:7 and 11:23-26.
  9. Why is it so important to answer yes immediately to the call of God to one’s heart? See Genesis 6:3; Matthew 24:44 and James 4:14.

INTRODUCTION

It takes no stretch of the imagination to know that Abraham went through the most crucial trial of his life in the offering of his beloved Son, in complete surrender. But this trip to Mount Moriah signified far more than just a trial for Abraham. When Isaac was taken to Mount Moriah to be sacrificed, to a point he typified the “Lamb of God” who would be offered for the sins of mankind on the cross of Calvary.

THEME THOUGHTS


Old Testament history paints a colourful picture of God’s dealing with man, but the New Testament brings us to the climax of God’s redemptive work—the Messiah, Jesus Christ.

“Who is Jesus?” is the thought-provoking question which establishes our theme for this quarter. Looking into the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, we trace the story of Jesus’ time on earth, including His birth and some of the major events of His life.

We find, as we delve into this story, that the incidents and occurrences recorded in a biographical sketch of Jesus hold many important lessons relevant to our lives today.

Some of the highlights of Jesus’ ministry and His personal example to us are brought out in such lessons as His calling of the twelve disciples, His example in resisting temptation, and His formula for happiness as found in the Beatitudes. The quarter concludes with one of Jesus’ parables which emphasizes the importance of being firmly grounded so that we might be able to grow as Christians.

The purpose of this quarter is to learn about Jesus Christ, not just as a personage of Biblical history, but as a living Savior who wants to be directly and personally involved in our lives.

QUESTION


1.In rehearsing the lesson on prophecy and fulfilment, how can we be assured that prophecies yet to be fulfilled will come to pass? See Luke 21:33 and 2 Timothy 3:16.

2.Using Psalm 143:10 and Philippians 2:13 as references, is it difficult for a Christian to do God’s will? Support your answer.

3.The good news of Jesus’ birth was made known to the shepherds by a heavenly host of angels. How is mankind today made knowledgeable of God’s love and plan of redemption?

4.What qualities stand out in the example of the Wise Men in their search for Jesus? Describe why these same traits are valuable in a Christian’s life today.

5.Simeon was rewarded for his faithfulness when he saw the promise of God fulfilled in the Christ Child. Noting Hebrews 10:23, what correlation can be found between holding “fast the profession of our faith without wavering,” and God being faithful to His promised return to earth?

6.The heavenly Father spared His Son from the anger of Herod. In what ways is providential care extended to God’s children today? See Psalm 91.

7.In 2 Corinthians 13:14, each member of the Godhead has an attribute expressed. What are these attributes and how did the Apostle learn this truth?

8.We learned in the study of overcoming temptation that everyone is tempted, and that temptations come from Satan. How can we be assured of victory over temptation? See James 4:7.

9.Explain the difference between being alert to God’s call and answering His call. Give two reasons why answering God’s call is so important.

10.Has God performed a miracle in your own life or on your behalf? If so, list briefly the steps that were taken by you or those involved to move the hand of God.

11.In studying the Beatitudes we find the thought of happiness in each of them. How does a person obtain this happiness in his own life?

12.After studying the parable of the sower and the seed, describe the kind of “soil” you yourself strive to be, and why.

INTRODUCTION


The parable of the “Sower and the Seed” is one that applies anytime God’s Word goes forth. The sower sows the seed, the seed is God’s Word, and the ground is the soul in whom the seed is sown. Within the four classes of ground discussed in this lesson, each person can be found.

THEME THOUGHTS


Old Testament history paints a colorful picture of God’s dealing with man, but the New Testament brings us to the climax of God’s redemptive work—the Messiah, Jesus Christ.

“Who is Jesus?” is the thought-provoking question which establishes our theme for this quarter. Looking into the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, we trace the story of Jesus’ time on earth, including His birth and some of the major events of His life.

We find, as we delve into this story, that the incidents and occurrences recorded in a biographical sketch of Jesus hold many important lessons relevant to our lives today.

Some of the highlights of Jesus’ ministry and His personal example to us are brought out in such lessons as His calling of the twelve disciples, His example in resisting temptation, and His formula for happiness as found in the Beatitudes. The quarter concludes with one of Jesus’ parables which emphasizes the importance of being firmly grounded so that we might be able to grow as Christians.

The purpose of this quarter is to learn about Jesus Christ, not just as a personage of Biblical history, but as a living Savior who wants to be directly and personally involved in our lives.

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


Matthew 13:1-9; Luke 8:4-15; 1 Corinthians 3:11-15

QUESTION


  1. What is a parable?
  2. Why do you think Jesus sometimes used parables when teaching?
  3. Jesus often said, “He that hath ears to hear, let him hear.” What do you think that means?
  4. What happened to the seed that fell by the wayside? How does that describe the spiritual awareness of some people?
  5. What happened to the seed that fell upon stony ground? What spiritual characteristics does the stony ground describe?
  6. What happened to the seed that fell among the thorns? How does thorny ground parallel with the spiritual life of some?
  7. How can we prepare ourselves to be good ground? Make a list of suggestions.
  8. Do you think it is better to produce thirty, sixty, or a hundredfold?
  9. Look up the references for the following Bible characters and write down what type of ground you think they represented. Be prepared to explain your answers.
    • Saul — 1 Samuel 28:15
    • Solomon — 1 Kings 11:4
    • Belshazzar — Daniel 5:22-23
    • Zacchaeus — Luke 19:6,8
    • Judas — John 6:70-71
    • Felix — Acts 24:25
    • Paul — 2 Timothy 4:7-8
    • Demas — Colossians 4:14; 2 Timothy 4:10

INTRODUCTION


Jesus’ teachings to His disciples and the multitudes as found in Matthew 5, 6 and 7 are known as the “Sermon on the Mount.” The blessings He pronounced at the beginning of that message are called The Beatitudes, which means “perfect blessedness or happiness.”

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


Psalms 84:11-12; 128:1-2

THEME THOUGHTS


Old Testament history paints a colorful picture of God’s dealing with man, but the New Testament brings us to the climax of God’s redemptive work—the Messiah, Jesus Christ.

“Who is Jesus?” is the thought-provoking question which establishes our theme for this quarter. Looking into the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, we trace the story of Jesus’ time on earth, including His birth and some of the major events of His life.

We find, as we delve into this story, that the incidents and occurrences recorded in a biographical sketch of Jesus hold many important lessons relevant to our lives today.

Some of the highlights of Jesus’ ministry and His personal example to us are brought out in such lessons as His calling of the twelve disciples, His example in resisting temptation, and His formula for happiness as found in the Beatitudes. The quarter concludes with one of Jesus’ parables which emphasizes the importance of being firmly grounded so that we might be able to grow as Christians.

The purpose of this quarter is to learn about Jesus Christ, not just as a personage of Biblical history, but as a living Savior who wants to be directly and personally involved in our lives.

QUESTION


What is the meaning of the word blessed, as found in the Beatitudes?

In reference to our key verse, there are four requirements in order to receive the promise that we shall be blessed in our doings. List these four requirements and briefly explain each.

How many of the basic ingredients for happiness listed in Matthew 5:3-12 are necessary if we wish to follow Jesus and truly be His disciples?

Listed below are eight basic ingredients Jesus gave for happiness. For each of these give a short definition of what you think is meant. In another column, list Jesus’ promise to those who exhibit that quality.

Quality                                       Meaning                                     Jesus’ Promise

The poor in spirit

They that mourn

The meek

They which hunger and thirst after righteousness

The merciful

The pure in heart

The peacemakers

The persecuted for righteousness’ sake

INTRODUCTION


What joy there is for the person who has faith in God and will obey His Word. Obedience brings blessing, for we find that the Lord works miracles often as the result of faith and obedience on the part of the recipients. In our lesson today, we see how these two ingredients combined to set the stage for Jesus’ first recorded miracle, and the start of His public ministry.

THEME THOUGHTS


Old Testament history paints a colorful picture of God’s dealing with man, but the New Testament brings us to the climax of God’s redemptive work—the Messiah, Jesus Christ.

“Who is Jesus?” is the thought-provoking question which establishes our theme for this quarter. Looking into the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, we trace the story of Jesus’ time on earth, including His birth and some of the major events of His life.

We find, as we delve into this story, that the incidents and occurrences recorded in a biographical sketch of Jesus hold many important lessons relevant to our lives today.

Some of the highlights of Jesus’ ministry and His personal example to us are brought out in such lessons as His calling of the twelve disciples, His example in resisting temptation, and His formula for happiness as found in the Beatitudes. The quarter concludes with one of Jesus’ parables which emphasizes the importance of being firmly grounded so that we might be able to grow as Christians.

The purpose of this quarter is to learn about Jesus Christ, not just as a personage of Biblical history, but as a living Savior who wants to be directly and personally involved in our lives.

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


Matthew 8:5-10,13; Mark 5:25-34; Luke 5:18-20,24-25; John 9:11

QUESTION


  1. What was the name of the village where Jesus performed His first miracle? What was the occasion that had brought Him there?
  2. Why do you think Mary said to Jesus, “They have no wine”?
  3. Why didn’t Jesus encourage Mary to believe that He would do something about the need?
  4. Why do you suppose Mary told the servants, “Whatsoever he saith unto you, do it”?
  5. Jesus told the servants to fill the six waterpots with water—no small task when we consider that in all likelihood it was drawn from a well. Since these servants weren’t employed by Jesus, why do you think they obeyed Him when presumably they should have been trying to obtain more wine?
  6. Jesus’ first miracle actually came about without His having any physical contact with the water, or in “telling” the water what it should become before it was served. Since it was performed with such simplicity, how do you suppose the servant felt when he drew wine from one of the pots and gave it to the governor of the feast?
  7. What was the response of the governor of the feast when he tasted from the cup given to him by a servant?
  8. Can we expect to see miracles if we do as Jesus commands us? Explain. See 1 John 5:14-15.
  9. In our text, who believed on Jesus because of the miracle?

INTRODUCTION


In calling men and women to follow Him, Jesus always spoke in words that could be comprehended by the hearers. The message of the Gospel is not veiled to the understanding. Throughout the centuries God has called countless men and women who answered and left all to follow Him. How vital it is to be alert to the calling of God in our own lives, and then to answer that call!

THEME THOUGHTS


Old Testament history paints a colourful picture of God’s dealing with man, but the New Testament brings us to the climax of God’s redemptive work—the Messiah, Jesus Christ.

“Who is Jesus?” is the thought-provoking question which establishes our theme for this quarter. Looking into the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, we trace the story of Jesus’ time on earth, including His birth and some of the major events of His life.

We find, as we delve into this story, that the incidents and occurrences recorded in a biographical sketch of Jesus hold many important lessons relevant to our lives today.

Some of the highlights of Jesus’ ministry and His personal example to us are brought out in such lessons as His calling of the twelve disciples, His example in resisting temptation, and His formula for happiness as found in the Beatitudes. The quarter concludes with one of Jesus’ parables which emphasizes the importance of being firmly grounded so that we might be able to grow as Christians.

The purpose of this quarter is to learn about Jesus Christ, not just as a personage of Biblical history, but as a living Savior who wants to be directly and personally involved in our lives.

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


Isaiah 6:8; Mark 3:14-15; Acts 9:15-16; 22:21; Ephesians 4:11-12

QUESTION


  1. What circumstances brought about the disciples’ first contact with Jesus?
  2. What was the first simple step taken by the disciples?
  3. What was Andrew’s reaction when introduced to Jesus?
  4. State some of the reasons people might give for not following Christ, or for not answering His call.
  5. How did God’s call to salvation come to you?
  6. After a person has answered God’s call to salvation, he will undoubtedly be called to do some particular service for God. How does God’s call for service come to individuals?
  7. What might be some of the common reactions or feelings of a person when God calls him to do a particular task?
  8. God does not ask everyone to do the same task, but there is one thing that every Christian is called to do. Using Psalm 107:2, identify a calling that every Christian shares, and explain how it can be answered.

SEARCH for STUDENTS: Unit 02 – An Angelic Proclamation

INTRODUCTION
What better way could Jesus understand our problems and temptations and show us how to overcome them than to face them Himself? Hebrews 4:15 tells us that He “was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin.” Since He has been through suffering and temptation He knows what it is like when we suffer and are tempted, and He is wonderfully able to help us. See Hebrews 2:18.
QUESTION
  1. What did Jesus possess that helps in overcoming temptation? See verse 1. Can we have the same help?
  2. Would it have been wrong for Jesus to have turned that stone into bread? Give a reason for your answer.
  3. What did Satan use in trying to cause the Lord to accept his offer of the kingdoms of the world? Were these kingdoms his to give?
  4. When Satan tempted Jesus to worship him, how did the Lord answer him? Can we defeat Satan in the same manner?
  5. As a last resort, Satan also tried using Scripture to make his final temptation acceptable to the Lord. What was that Scripture, and how does Satan use Scripture when trying to deceive people today?
  6. What is temptation, and will it come to a well-established Christian? Is it sin?
  7. Write several ways by which we can overcome temptation.
  8. While God has made it possible for everyone to be overcomers, what should a person do if he has yielded to the temptation to sin? See Revelation 2:5.

 

SEARCH for STUDENTS: Unit 02 – The Holy Trinity

INTRODUCTION
The New Testament states that one of God’s purposes in sending Christ to this world was to reveal Himself more fully to man (John 1:17-18). The study of the Holy Trinity is a glimpse into God’s divine nature as revealed to us more clearly in the New Testament, for without this fundamental precept there can be no deity of our Lord Jesus Christ, or of the Holy Spirit. Through the Trinity we see real unity in God the Father’s love, Jesus’ grace and intercession, and the Holy Spirit’s comfort and presence in us.
QUESTION
  1. Genesis 1:1 states, “In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.” The Hebrew word for God here is the plural form, “Elohim.” Used together with the singular form of the word, “created,” we see the unity of the divine Godhead in the work of creation. Verse 2 of this chapter refers to “the Spirit of God,” completing the reference to the Trinity. What words in each of the following verses demonstrate the Trinity? See Genesis 1:26; 3:22; 11:7 and 1 John 5:7.
  2. What does the last part of 1 John 5:7 tell us about the Trinity?
  3. In the Matthew account of John’s baptism of Jesus, describe how each person of the Trinity was revealed.
  4. Why do you think the account of John’s water baptism of Jesus occurs in all of the four Gospels?
  5. John the Baptist spoke of Christ’s ministry as fulfilling and exceeding his own. What promise was given to those who believed in Christ regarding the third Person of the Trinity—the Holy Spirit? See Matthew 3:11 and Mark 1:8. What promise is given to people today in this respect? See Acts 2:38-39.
  6. What is the contribution of each person of the Godhead toward the salvation of mankind? See Romans 5:5- 6. For a clearer understanding of the work of the Holy Spirit, see John 16:8,13-14.
  7. In what attitude of prayer and worship should we come into the presence of the Triune God who extends to us His infinite authority and power? See Isaiah 55:6-7; 57:15 and Hebrews 13:15.

SEARCH for STUDENTS: Unit 02 – God’s Providential Care

INTRODUCTION
We walk through a world that is fraught with dangers, and the only source of true protection is God. In our text, God’s providential care is beautifully shown by the angel’s directing Joseph to take the young child Jesus and His mother to Egypt. However, God’s care is not limited to the preservation of His Son. It is fulfilled in the life of each one who follows His Word.
QUESTION
  1. Give a definition of divine providence. Who enjoys this blessing?
  2. By whom and for what reason was Joseph instructed to take Jesus and Mary into Egypt? Why was Egypt chosen? See Hosea 11:1 and Matthew 2:15.
  3. Why did Herod order the killing of children who were two years of age and under? See Matthew 2:16-18.
  4. In Matthew 1 and 2, how many times did an angel appear to Joseph with instructions from God? List several ways that God shows His providence today.
  5. In Psalm 91, a key is given by which divine providence may be obtained. What is that key?
  6. In applying the Scripture to our day, make a list of at least six blessings promised to us in Psalm 91.
  7. When the devil tempted Jesus (Matthew 4:6), he quoted Psalm 91:11-12. What part of that quote did the devil leave out? Why did Jesus resist the temptation?
  8. Psalm 91:14-16 seems to be a direct quote from God. What might be meant by “set his love upon me,” and “shew him my salvation”? See John 3:16.
  9. Give an example of divine providence in your life, or in the life of someone you know.

SEARCH for STUDENTS: Unit 02 – God’s Promise Fulfilled

INTRODUCTION
Jesus made a permanent impression on everyone He came into contact with. Even Herod and the others who rejected Him were never the same again. Today, all who will receive Him, as Simeon and Anna did, will obtain the benefit of the promises recorded in the Word of God. Jesus is our salvation and through Him we have a new outlook on life and a beautiful hope for the future.
QUESTION
  1. What are two moral attributes mentioned in Luke 2:25, which adorned Simeon’s life?
  2. Who revealed to Simeon that he would not see death before he had seen the “Lord’s Christ”? What role does that Person have in our lives today?
  3. Why did Simeon bless God and know, with confidence, that he could now “depart in peace”?
  4. What was the significance of Mary’s giving her firstborn Son the name Jesus? See verse 21.
  5. What attitude is manifested in the lives of each of those who recognized the fulfillment of promise and were privileged to see the Baby Jesus?
    • The Shepherds — Luke 2:15-17, 20
    • The Wise Men — Matthew 2:9-11
    • Simeon — Luke 2:27-28
    • Anna — Luke 2:38
  6. Look back over the past four lessons. Briefly summarize what promises were given, and state how these were fulfilled in the text of today’s lesson.
  7. What parallel can we draw between the days in which we are now living and the promises of God, and the prophecies of His Word which were fulfilled by Jesus’ first advent?
  8. Noting the key verse, what connection can be found in holding fast the profession of our faith without wavering, and God being faithful to His promise?

 

 

 

SEARCH for STUDENTS: Unit 02 – What “Star” Are You Following?

INTRODUCTION
The sighting of the star in the east was the beginning of the diligent search by the Wise Men. Their mission served to answer the question, “Who is Jesus?” We have the opportunity to follow their example as we seek for things of spiritual value so that we might know Christ better.
QUESTION
  1. How do you think the Wise Men knew that they were searching for the One who was “King of the Jews”? See Matthew 2:2.
  2. Why do you think Herod, and all Jerusalem with him, was so troubled upon hearing of the newborn King?
  3. How did the chief priest and the scribes know where Christ should be born? See Micah 5:2.
  4. Why were the Wise Men so happy to see the star again after they departed from the king?
  5. What did the Wise Men do before they presented their gifts to the newborn King?
  6. What gifts can we offer the Lord today? See Romans 12:1 and Hebrews 13:15-16.
  7. The Wise Men followed the star which led them to Christ. God still gives man a light to follow. What do you think directs us to Christ today?
  8. Are many seeking to follow the Savior today? Why or why not?
  9. The Wise Men followed the star even though the journey was difficult. They persevered until they reached their goal. Using the Wise Men as an example, what should our attitude be as we strive for the heavenly goal?

SEARCH for STUDENTS: Unit 02 – An Angelic Proclamation

The angelic proclamation, “For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour, which is Christ the
Lord” (Luke 2:11), announced God’s greatest gift to mankind. This message was given to the shepherds
on the Judean hills. They did not doubt the wondrous declaration, for they saw the attendant glory, and
they would soon spread the news to others. God’s angels must have realized the importance of the announcement, for as soon as the good tidings were made known, a multitude of the heavenly host joined
in the exultation, “Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, goodwill toward men” (Luke 2:14).

1. Where was Mary living previous to the birth of Jesus? Where was it prophesied that Jesus should be born? See Micah 5:2.

2. What circumstance did God use to make sure Mary would be in Bethlehem at the birth of Jesus?

3. Why do you feel God chose to proclaim the good news to shepherds rather than to some authoritative figures?

4. What did the shepherds do with the great news that was told to them?

5. Write what you feel is meant by the word pondered as used in verse 19.

6. Read Philippians 2:5-8. In your own words, explain why you feel it was necessary for Jesus to be born “in the likeness of men.”

7. The celebration of Christmas can be used to spread the story of Jesus. Write down some ways the Christmas season can provide opportunities for evangelistic outreach.

SEARCH for STUDENTS: Unit 02 – Gabriel Speaks Out

INTRODUCTION

Our lesson is part of the Christmas story which undoubtedly has been told and retold more than any other story ever written. So without dwelling long on the historical fact of Jesus’ birth, let us consider why God
singled out Mary for the highest honor ever bestowed on a woman. Her willingness to submit to God’s plan was, no doubt, one of the reasons He chose her over all the young virgins of the house of David to be the mother of His Son, Jesus.

1. In Bible times, God often used angels to carry messages to people. Since this was so, why do you think Mary was troubled at the angel’s greeting?

2. What did the angel say when he noticed Mary was troubled?

3. Do you think that Mary showed a lack of faith when she questioned the angel about how this could be?
Explain.

4. What was Mary’s response to the message that her child would be called the Son of God? What characteristics did she demonstrate by that reply?

5. In what ways did Mary exhibit these character traits?

6. Why are the attributes which Mary exemplified necessary for one serving the Lord today?

7. In reference to our key verse, the first phrase implies that doing the will of God may need to be learned.
What are some of the ways the Lord teaches us? What can we do in order to be apt learners?

8. What are some of the benefits that are promised us if we are submissive to God? In addition to our text, see John 7:17, Romans 8:14-17, and Romans 12:2

SEARCH for STUDENTS: Unit 02 – Who Is Jesus?

INTRODUCTION

Prophecy — Fulfillment

Isaiah 9:6-7 — Matthew 1:16

Isaiah 7:14 — Matthew 1:18-25

Micah 5:2 — Matthew 2:1

Prophecy Yet to be Fulfilled

Acts 1:10-11

1 Corinthians 15:51-52

1 Thessalonians 4:16-17

Throughout the 4000 years of history before the coming of Christ, we can see how God masterminded His plan of salvation which would be fulfilled in Christ. In the Old Testament, we find many authors of different ages and places supplying the bits, pieces, types, shadows, and detailed predictions which describe Christ’s purpose in coming to this earth, His manner of life, the reason for His death, and His triumph over death through the Resurrection.

The same prophets who gave us advance details of Christ’s first coming speak expressly of a coming day when righteousness will triumph over evil. As surely as the details predicted were fulfilled in Christ’s first coming, just so surely shall this earth experience the Rapture of the saints, and then the coming of Christ with His saints for 1000 years of peace, goodwill toward men!

QUESTION

  1. What is prophecy? (Consult Webster or a Bible dictionary.)
  2. What is the mark of a true prophet? See Jeremiah 28:9.
  3. Who received this promise, “. . . and in thee shall all families of the earth be blessed”? See Genesis 12:3. Explain in your own words what this promise might mean.
  4. Isaiah wrote over 700 years before Christ was born. Compare Isaiah 7:14 with Matthew 1:18-25 and comment on how we benefit by studying prophecy and its fulfillment. See also 2 Peter 1:21.
  5. Why is the virgin birth of Christ important? See Luke 1:26-27, 35.
  6. Who is the prophet referred to in Matthew 2:5-6? And how do we know that the Jewish scribes of King Herod’s time knew about this prophecy and understood it?
  7. Memorize the five beautifully descriptive terms used in Isaiah 9:6 to denote Christ’s names. Place the name which you think best applies opposite the New Testament Scriptures given below:
    • Matthew 21:15; Acts 2:11
    • Matthew 28:20
    • John 14:27
    • John 3:1-2
    • John 10:29-30
  8. Describe in your own words the future event pictured in 1 Corinthians 15:51-52 and 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18.
  9. Summarize the event prophesied by the angels in Acts 1:11 which has not yet happened. See Zechariah 13:1-2,6,9; 14:3-11 and Revelation 20:4. How are we certain that this event will take place?
  10. In Matthew 24, Jesus gave us signs which were to immediately precede His return to earth. These included the appearance of false Christs, wars, famines, pestilences, earthquakes, persecution of Chris- tians, apostasy of previous believers, worldwide preaching of the Gospel, and the re-emergence of Israel as a nation. Seeing these signs around us, we cannot help but conclude that we are living in the time of the soon coming of our Lord. Among the living, who will be caught up to join the Lord in the air when the Trumpet of the Lord sounds for the Rapture of the saints? See John 8:31; 1 John 1:7 and Revelation 2:3.

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


Numbers 24:17; Isaiah 53:1-12

THEME THOUGHTS


Old Testament history paints a colorful picture of God’s dealing with man, but the New Testament brings us to the climax of God’s redemptive work—the Messiah, Jesus Christ.

“Who is Jesus?” is the thought-provoking question that establishes our theme for this quarter. Looking into the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, we trace the story of Jesus’ time on earth, including His birth and some of the major events of His life.

We find, as we delve into this story, that the incidents and occurrences recorded in a biographical sketch of Jesus hold many important lessons relevant to our lives today.

Some of the highlights of Jesus’ ministry and His personal example to us are brought out in such lessons as His calling of the twelve disciples, His example in resisting temptation, and His formula for happiness as found in the Beatitudes. The quarter concludes with one of Jesus’ parables which emphasizes the importance of being firmly grounded so that we might be able to grow as Christians.

The purpose of this quarter is to learn about Jesus Christ, not just as a personage of Biblical history, but as a living Savior who wants to be directly and personally involved in our lives.

INTRODUCTION


Included in the establishing of God’s written Law was the process to be followed in administering the Law. The tribe of Levi was charged with the care of the sanctuary and the serving. Aaron and his sons, being of the tribe of Levi, were set apart for the priesthood; and this office was passed down from father to son.

QUESTION


  1. What was the purpose of the Old Testament priesthood?
  2. Why was it necessary for an Old Testament priest to make an offering for his own sins?
  3. How was Aaron chosen to be the first high priest?
  4. Why was the Old Testament priesthood not intended to be permanent? See Hebrews 8:4-11.
  5. Read Hebrews 7:11-16. Was Jesus a descendant of Aaron? After what order was He a priest?
  6. What were some of the things Christ went through to obtain this better priesthood? See Hebrews 5:7-9.
  7. How is it that Christ can so readily relate to our disappointments, frustrations, and trials? See Hebrews 2:16-18.
  8. Why would you rather be under Christ’s priesthood than the Levitical priesthood?
  9. What is God’s promise to one in the time of need? See Hebrews 4:16.
  10. Read Numbers 16:41-48. In what way was Aaron a mediator for the Children of Israel? In what way is Christ our mediator today?

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


Numbers 17:1-11

THEME THOUGHTS


It is not difficult to go through the Bible and compile an extensive list of first events from which we can learn valuable lessons. Most people are interested in how or when something started and who started it. This quarter will focus on beginnings. The first two lessons deal with the beginning of everything—Creation and the first man. The next two are about the first sin and the first plan of escape from God’s judgment for sin. The next lesson is about the people who built the first “skyscraper” and the pitfalls of trying to be independent from God.

Four Bible characters will be studied: the first Hebrew, Abraham; the first leader, Moses; Israel’s first priest, Aaron; and the first king of Israel, Saul. There also will be a lesson on God’s first written Law.

The point of studying these lessons is to help us get a better understanding of some of the firsts in Bible history and, more importantly, to learn that, since the beginning of our world, each of these has played an important part in Gods plan for our lives. We want to grow spiritually from what we have learned.

INTRODUCTION
QUESTION
  1. Make a list of what God created on each of the six days and explain briefly how the progression of the successive creative acts were perfectly arranged.
  2. In what way is man unique from all God’s other creations?
  3. Temptation is common to man, but God has given a promise to those who serve Him. What is that promise? See 1 Corinthians 10:13.
  4. What lesson can we learn from the example of Noah and his family regarding God’s judgment?
  5. The builders of Babel failed when they disobeyed God and attempted to create their own security, and make a name for themselves. According to 1 Corinthians 3:9-15, who is the Christian’s co-laborer in building a spiritual house?
  6. Abram had an intimate relationship with God. Because of his noble character and faith in God, James 2:23 tells us he was called which one of the following: a) helper, b) friend, c) brother, or d) father of God? How might a Christian in today’s crowded environment cultivate this same relationship?
  7. Briefly describe the manner in which God called Moses. Then list the similarities and differences between Moses’ call and the call of God to individuals today.
  8. The first written Law of God is known as the Ten Commandments. God gave them so that man might live in harmony with Him and with each other. What bearing do they have upon a Christian’s life today?
  9. Sinful man needs an intercessor in order to come to God. What steps did Jesus take to become our High Priest? See Hebrews 2:17.
  10. Most people, unlike Saul, desire to be promoted in the eyes of those around them. Describe the prerequisites for spiritual success and explain where promotion comes from. Use 1 Peter 5:5-6 for a reference as well as the text for this lesson.
  11. God ordained that the children of Levi were to use the tithes for their own sustenance. What are our tithes and offerings used for in the church today? Does God’s blessing given in Malachi 3:10 still apply to us today?

INTRODUCTION
Among the definitions of the word thanksgiving are: “the act of giving thanks,” “a prayer expressing gratitude,” and “a public acknowledgment or celebration of divine goodness.” Although the word thanksgiving does not appear in Psalm 103, this Psalm is an excellent expression of heartfelt gratitude and praise to God. The more one praises and thanks God for His goodness, the more reasons he finds for doing so. To deny God genuine thanksgiving is to fail to recognize God’s wonderful bounty to each individual.
QUESTION
  1. In looking at the first verse of our text, with what part of his being did the Psalmist bless (praise) the Lord? Why? See John 4:23.
  2. Name six benefits the Psalmist listed as coming from the Lord. How do you feel about these benefits?
  3. What is likened to the eagle in verse 5? Why give thanks for this?
  4. How do the oppressed fare when they trust the Lord?
  5. List five other items, mentioned in verses 8 and 9 of our text, for which we should be thankful.
  6. What are the wages of sin (Romans 6:23)? How does the Psalmist treat this truth (verse 10)?
  7. How far does God remove the sins of those who repent? Why should this cause thanksgiving?
  8. Why does God have pity upon His children? See verses 13 and 14.
  9. In what way is the duration of life brought to our attention?
  10. In what way is the mercy of the Lord emphasized? Why should this be an inspiration for thanksgiving?

INTRODUCTION
The Lord does not need anything that man has accumulated. He owns the cattle on a thousand hills (Psalm 50:10), the silver and gold (Haggai 2:8), the earth and everything in it (Psalm 24:1). However, He expects us to be good stewards of what He permits us to acquire. From Abraham’s time on, God has blessed those who have given tithes and freewill offerings to the Lord. The tithe and certain offerings were required under the Old Testament Law of Moses. Tithing is not dwelt upon in the New Testament, but it was still approved of by Jesus. At one point, as He was giving a warning to the scribes and Pharisees, He called them hypocrites. They did tithe, but neglected more important matters like justice, mercy, and faithfulness. If the plan of tithing were to be done away with, Jesus would not have told them they should do these vital things as well as give tithes. See Matthew 23:23.
QUESTION
  1. Shortly after their deliverance from Egypt, the Children of Israel were told by God to be prompt in offering the first part of all their increase (Exodus 22:29). What do you think this meant?
  2. The first written record we have of anyone’s paying tithes was when Abram paid tithes to Melchizedek (Genesis 14:18-20). To whom do our tithes belong and why? See Leviticus 27:30.
  3. The Israelites could not give their tithes to the Lord in person, but God had a plan for the tithes. In reading Numbers 18:21, what do you feel that plan was?
  4. Since we are not Israelites with a priesthood to support, where should our tithes and offerings go?
  5. What do you think is meant by Malachi 3:8?
  6. What was God’s promise to those who did bring in their tithes?
  7. Do you think the “poor widow” mentioned in Luke 21:2 was foolish to do what she did? Give a reason for your answer.
  8. How do you relate Matthew 25:35-40 with the thought of the title of this lesson?

INTRODUCTION


This study shows clearly that God is vitally concerned about benefiting His people. When Israel persisted in their request for a king, God used circumstances to bring together the long-time prophet Samuel and a young man whose name was Saul. Despite Saul’s impressive appearance, he demonstrated qualities of humility and obedience, two characteristics necessary to be a leader of God’s people. If we possess these qualities, we will experience spiritual success and promotion from the Lord.

QUESTIONS


  1. What position did Samuel occupy in addition to being a prophet to the people of Israel? How long did he occupy this position? See 1 Samuel 7:15-17.
  2. Samuel was grieved that the Israelites had asked for a king. He felt as though he had been rejected, but, in 1 Samuel 8:7, God told Samuel this was not so. Who did God say the people had rejected, and why?
  3. Throughout 1 Samuel 8, we read that Samuel had carefully followed God’s instructions, pointing out to the Israelites the future oppression they would suffer under such kings who would require of them some of their sons and daughters and a portion of their wealth. Despite that, the people still rejected God’s council. How does Isaiah 1: 19-20 agree with Samuel’s message to the people? What did God finally instruct Samuel to do? See 1 Samuel 8:22.
  4. Circle the right answer:
    • Saul was of the tribe of … (1) Dan (2) Ephraim (3) Benjamin (4) Judah
    • He was … (1) little of stature (2) taller than others (3) a poor physical specimen
    • His father’s name was . .. (1) Abiel (2) Zeror (3) Bechorath (4) Kish
    • Saul was … (1) proud (2) humble and obedient (3) disobedient.
  5. The extent of a family’s livestock in Saul’s day was a measure of its prosperity. How did Saul respond to his father’s request to seek the lost donkeys? Was he thorough in his search? Why? See 1 Samuel 9:3-10, 20.
  6. Do you think it was coincidental that Saul, in his search for the lost donkeys, came to Samuel at the end of his third day’s search? Why or why not? See 1 Samuel 9: 15-16.
  7. Mark the following statements true or false:
    • (a) Saul had been anointed by Samuel prior to his coronation in 1 Samuel 10:24. See 1 Samuel 9:16; 10:1.
    • (b) Saul traveled with Samuel to the coronation. See 1 Samuel 10:21-22.
    • (c) God demonstrated to the Israelites the man that He had chosen to be king by directing the casting of lots (similar to drawing names). First, a tribe was chosen (Benjamin), then a family from that tribe (Matri), then a man from that family. See 1 Samuel 10:20-21.
    • (d) Saul immediately confirmed his kingdom by putting the political dissenters into prison. See 1 Samuel 10:27.
  8. God has given Christians a system of success and promotion in His service. This is very different from the system used by most individuals, corporations, or by those seeking political office today. After studying 1 Peter 5:5-6 and this lesson, comment here on how you feel God’s system differs from that of the world’s.

THEME THOUGHTS


It is not difficult to go through the Bible and compile an extensive list of first events from which we can learn valuable lessons. Most people are interested in how or when something started and who started it. This quarter will focus on beginnings. The first two lessons deal with the beginning of everything—Creation and the first man. The next two are about the first sin and the first plan of escape from God’s judgment for sin. The next lesson is about the people who built the first “skyscraper” and the pitfalls of trying to be independent from God.

Four Bible characters will be studied: the first Hebrew, Abraham; the first leader, Moses; Israel’s first priest, Aaron; and the first king of Israel, Saul. There also will be a lesson on God’s first written Law.

The point of studying these lessons is to help us get a better understanding of some of the firsts in Bible history and, more importantly, to learn that, since the beginning of our world, each of these has played an important part in Gods plan for our lives. We want to grow spiritually from what we have learned.

INTRODUCTION
God’s chosen people were the Children of Israel. His first written Law was given to them through the prophet Moses. It began with the Ten Commandments, which were later written on tables of stone by the finger of God (Exodus 31:18). All of these laws and ordinances were specific, and the people were required to know them and to teach them to their children. See Deuteronomy 6:6-9.
QUESTION
  1. When and where did God give Moses and the Children of Israel the Ten Commandments? See Exodus 19:1, 20-25.
  2. Briefly write down each of the Ten Commandments.
  3. Which of these commandments covered the people’s relationship with God? with their fellow man?
  4. What was God’s promise to the Children of Israel if they kept all His commandments? See Exodus 19:5-6 and Deuteronomy 28:1-14
  5. What did Paul the Apostle say was the first commandment with promise (Ephesians 6:2-3)? What does the phrase “with promise” signify?
  6. What was Jesus’ reply when He was asked, “which is the great commandment in the law?” See Matthew 22:36-40.
  7. What did Jesus mean, in Matthew 22:40, when He said, “On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets”?
  8. What was the reply of the rich young ruler when Jesus told him he would have eternal life if he would “keep the commandments”? How did Jesus answer him? See Matthew 19:16-22.
  9. Today we live under the New Testament covenant through Jesus Christ, and not under the Old Testament Law of Moses. Under this new covenant, where does God tell us He will put His laws? See Jeremiah 31:31-34 and Hebrews 10:16-18.

INTRODUCTION
The commission Moses received from God, to lead the Children of Israel from bondage in Egypt to the Promised Land, was a huge one. Great issues were at stake and much would depend on him. One cannot blame Moses for saying, “Who am I?” When God calls one to a position of responsibility in His service, that person may not feel sufficient. But God’s commands are His enablings; with an order there is given the required strength and wisdom. Surely there was great comfort and reassurance in the promise that God gave Moses: “Certainly I will be with thee.”
QUESTION
  1. Where was Moses when he heard the call of God? Why do you think God choose that location?
  2. God allowed some unusual circumstances to direct the course of Moses’ early life. Briefly outline those events, using Acts 7:20-29.
  3. God used a supernatural manifestation to call Moses. How does He call people today? How can we know that any call from God is just as important as His call to Moses though it may not be given in such a spectacular way?
  4. Of what importance was it to Moses when God declared Himself to be the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob?
  5. Parallel Moses’ response to how some people respond today when they feel the call of God.
  6. In verse 12 of our text, God promised Moses a token. What was that token? Does God do this for us today? Explain.
  7. In our key verse, God made three promises regarding what He will do for His people. What were they?
  8. What did God promise Moses He would do for the Children of Israel? Draw the parallel between the promise to the Israelites and the promise to Christians.
  9. Humility is an essential quality of leadership in the work of the Lord. What word is used in Numbers 12:3 to describe this quality in Moses’ life?

INTRODUCTION


God is continually looking for one who will make up the hedge and stand in the gap (Ezekiel 22:30). Often He is disappointed, but the Bible tells us of some who did respond to the call of God. Among these was Abraham. Because of his implicit faith in God, he is known as “the Friend of God” (James 2:23). Isn’t it wonderful that Jesus said we, too, can be His friend (John 15:14-15)?

QUESTION


  1. What were the promises that God made to Abram and on what were they conditioned?
  2. List some promises God has made to you and reflect on what you have to do to receive them.
  3. Of the seven promises God gave to Abram, which do you consider to be the most important to us? Why?
  4. Genesis 12:1 tells us Abram was promised a land which God would show him. Where was that land? What other verse in our text brings out God’s promise that He would give this land to Abram’s descendants?
  5. When Abram was ninety-nine years old God told him to “walk before me and be thou perfect.” Explain in your own words what this means. Why did God require this of Abram? See Genesis 17:2.
  6. In His sermon on the mount, Jesus tells us to be perfect (Matthew 5:48). How many other references to perfection can you find in the New Testament?
  7. What significance is there in the fact that God changed Abram’s name to Abraham?
  8. List some ways that Psalm 1 might apply to Abraham.
  9. It is obvious that Abraham received some wonderful benefits by following the Lord. In reading Psalm 1, we find some benefits to which we, too, have access if we follow the Lord. The first verse of this Psalm lists three contingencies. For each, give an example or illustration applicable to our day.
  10. Psalm 1:3 promises the godly man that “whatsoever he doeth shall prosper.” How can we explain this verse in light of the fact that, obviously, all Christians are not materially prosperous?

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


Psalm 1:1-6

THEME THOUGHTS


It is not difficult to go through the Bible and compile an extensive list of first events from which we can learn valuable lessons. Most people are interested in how or when something started and who started it. This quarter will focus on beginnings. The first two lessons deal with the beginning of everything—Creation and the first man. The next two are about the first sin and the first plan of escape from God’s judgment for sin. The next lesson is about the people who built the first “skyscraper” and the pitfalls of trying to be independent from God.

Four Bible characters will be studied: the first Hebrew, Abraham; the first leader, Moses; Israel’s first priest, Aaron; and the first king of Israel, Saul. There also will be a lesson on God’s first written Law.

The point of studying these lessons is to help us get a better understanding of some of the firsts in Bible history and, more importantly, to learn that, since the beginning of our world, each of these has played an important part in God’s plan for our lives. We want to grow spiritually from what we have learned.

INTRODUCTION


It is astounding that, with Noah still alive about one hundred years after the Flood, the people of the earth should so lose their fear of God that they did not hesitate to join themselves in a project defying Him. Building a tower and concentrating their population instead of spreading out and repopulating the earth as God had commanded (Genesis 9:1), demonstrated their independent spirit and resistance to God. Because of their disobedience, God intervened and confused their language, thus preventing the world from again being given over totally to sin and lawlessness. God’s Word is our blueprint for building our spiritual house. Deviation from this blueprint will result in the same confusion and disaster experienced by the people of Babel.

THEME THOUGHTS


It is not difficult to go through the Bible and compile an extensive list of first events from which we can learn valuable lessons. Most people are interested in how or when something started and who started it. This quarter will focus on beginnings. The first two lessons deal with the beginning of everything—Creation and the first man. The next two are about the first sin and the first plan of escape from God’s judgment for sin. The next lesson is about the people who built the first “skyscraper” and the pitfalls of trying to be independent from God.

Four Bible characters will be studied: the first Hebrew, Abraham; the first leader, Moses; Israel’s first priest, Aaron; and the first king of Israel, Saul. There also will be a lesson on God’s first written Law.

The point of studying these lessons is to help us get a better understanding of some of the firsts in Bible history and, more importantly, to learn that, since the beginning of our world, each of these has played an important part in Gods plan for our lives. We want to grow spiritually from what we have learned.

QUESTION


  1. Who did the people of Babel consult with as they made plans to build a city and a tower? Who should they have approached about the matter? Why?
  2. Note here two reasons why the men of Babel decided to build a city and a tower whose “top may reach unto heaven.”
  3. Who visited the people as they attempted to build the city and tower at Babel, and why? Is God interested in our plans today? Why or why not?
  4. What action did the Lord decide to take regarding the building project at Babel? Why?
  5. As Christians, we are co-laborers with God in building our spiritual house. List several things which show God’s part in this labor. List several things which show our part.
  6. In 1 Corinthians 3:12, the writer mentions various materials which one might use to build his spiritual house. Note here several Christians’ experiences and Christian character attributes which he may be referring to as “gold, silver, precious stones.” Now contrast these with what you think the writer may mean by “wood, hay, stubble.” See John 17:17; Acts 2:39; Galatians 3:2-3; 5:22-23; Hebrews 6:1; James 1:22 and 1 Peter1:5-7.
  7. Explain what you feel the word fire refers to in 1 Corinthians 3:13.
  8. How is it possible to lose the heavenly reward which we might have gained in our service for Christ? And how is it possible to be assured of that reward?

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


Isaiah 55:6-9

INTRODUCTION


Just a few generations after Adam’s sin, God saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every imagination of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually. Being grieved with this condition, God decreed judgment upon corrupt mankind, but “Noah found grace in the eyes of the Lord” and he and his family were spared from destruction. Thus we find from the beginning of God’s dealings with men that His love provides, for those who repent, a way of escape from judgment.

THEME THOUGHTS


It is not difficult to go through the Bible and compile an extensive list of first events from which we can learn valuable lessons. Most people are interested in how or when something started and who started it. This quarter will focus on beginnings. The first two lessons deal with the beginning of everything—Creation and the first man. The next two are about the first sin and the first plan of escape from God’s judgment for sin. The next lesson is about the people who built the first “skyscraper” and the pitfalls of trying to be independent from God.

Four Bible characters will be studied: the first Hebrew, Abraham; the first leader, Moses; Israel’s first priest, Aaron; and the first king of Israel, Saul. There also will be a lesson on God’s first written Law.

The point of studying these lessons is to help us get a better understanding of some of the firsts in Bible history and, more importantly, to learn that, since the beginning of our world, each of these has played an important part in Gods plan for our lives. We want to grow spiritually from what we have learned.

QUESTION


  1. Why was Noah told to build the ark, and from what source did he receive instructions to build such a vessel?
  2. Give a description of the ark. How did Noah know that it would be seaworthy, or even float?
  3. What took place as soon as Noah was finished building the ark? What space of time came between this event and the actual Flood? What significance can be placed upon this circumstance?
  4. Who shut the door when Noah and his family were in the ark? Why?
  5. Because Noah was a righteous man, he was saved from the Flood. Do you feel that God will eventually destroy the righteous with the wicked when He sends judgment upon the earth again? Why or why not?
  6. Explain how the earth will eventually be destroyed. See 2 Peter 3:10.
  7. What similarity is there between the days of Noah and the days in which we live? Matthew 24:37-39.

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


Matthew 24:37-39

INTRODUCTION


Temptation is the means by which Satan attempts to deceive mankind into disobeying God. It is the common lot of all. But a Christian who faces up to temptation and utilizes the source of his strength-the overcoming power of God-will not fall into sin as did Adam and Eve.

THEME THOUGHTS


It is not difficult to go through the Bible and compile an extensive list of first events from which we can learn valuable lessons. Most people are interested in how or when something started and who started it. This quarter will focus on beginnings. The first two lessons deal with the beginning of everything—Creation and the first man. The next two are about the first sin and the first plan of escape from God’s judgment for sin. The next lesson is about the people who built the first “skyscraper” and the pitfalls of trying to be independent from God.

Four Bible characters will be studied: the first Hebrew, Abraham; the first leader, Moses; Israel’s first priest, Aaron; and the first king of Israel, Saul. There also will be a lesson on God’s first written Law.

The point of studying these lessons is to help us get a better understanding of some of the firsts in Bible history and, more importantly, to learn that, since the beginning of our world, each of these has played an important part in God’s plan for our lives. We want to grow spiritually from what we have learned.

QUESTION


  1. What is the dictionary definition of the word tempt?
  2. Give a definition of sin.
  3. Temptation always precedes sin and yet it is obvious the two are not the same. Yielding to Satan’s temptations is what causes sin. What means did God provide for Adam and Eve to escape yielding to the temptation?
  4. How did the serpent’s question, “Yea, hath God said, Ye shall not eat of every tree of the garden?” lead into temptation?
  5. The devil promised Eve that she and Adam would be as gods, knowing good and evil. What could they gain by yielding?
  6. Sin was introduced by the first lie. What was the first lie? What are the characteristics of a lie?
  7. Using 1 John 2:16, what are the points of contact with the world that would lead us into temptation?
  8. John 17:15-16 indicates that we do not need to be taken out of the world in order to be kept from evil. List several things we can do to avoid being overcome by temptation.

Through man’s temptation and subsequent yielding, the curse of sin was brought into the world. But God offers mercy through His plan of redemption. The first promise of this is given in Genesis 3:15. On the Cross, the heel of the Savior was bruised in death, but the head of the serpent (Satan) is bruised every time a lost soul is redeemed or one of God’s redeemed withstands temptation.

 

INTRODUCTION


What a person believes about his origin greatly affects his entire philosophy of life. If a man were convinced that he does not have an eternal soul, then it would seem to him that he would have no responsibility to God for the way he lives his life. But a person’s disbelief in the Bible does not release that one from his responsibility to God. As Christians, we believe that the most important decision a man can make is the one that will affect the eternal destiny of his soul. It is imperative that we arm ourselves against those who would erode this basic belief that man was created by God in His own image and possesses a never-dying soul. We can do this by studying the Bible, God’s divine Word, with the simplicity of faith.

QUESTION


  1. When the initial part of the Creation was completed and the earth was in readiness, God performed His last creative act-He made man. Why did God make man? See Isaiah 43:7 and Revelation 4:11.
  2. How was man’s physical body created? What factor made the creation of man unique or different from all the creative acts which had already taken place?
  3. Man is distinguished from all other living creatures in that he alone possesses a living soul. How and why was man given a soul?
  4. Genesis 1:26-27 states that man was created in God’s image and likeness. What does this mean to you?
  5. Causing a deep sleep to come upon Adam, God took one of Adam’s ribs and from it created a woman. Then He brought the woman to Adam for a helpmate. Why did God feel man needed a helpmate?
  6. Read Psalm 8:4-8. What place was man given in God’s creation?
  7. What is meant by the word dominionin Genesis 1:28?
  8. How will the Christian look at God’s creations differently than the non-Christian?

Search Lesson 001

INTRODUCTION


The Bible is not only a book of beginnings, but also a book of eternities. The very supreme revelation of the Bible is the revelation of God. If one starts to think of the beginning, using his own reasoning, he will have trouble and will possibly supply a humanistic assumption for the real beginning. He would therefore substitute the creature’s point of view for the Creator’s point of view. Among many scientists, there are basic differences of opinion as to the origin of the universe. Evolutionists hold that all living things developed from non-living materials. Creationists believe that all basic categories of nature were brought into being by a supernatural force. It takes as much faith to subscribe to the theory that our complex universe is a mere chance happening as to accept the first verse of the inspired Word which declares, “In the beginning, God created the heaven and the earth.”

THEME THOUGHTS


It is not difficult to go through the Bible and compile an extensive list of first events from which we can learn valuable lessons. Most people are interested in how or when something started and who started it. This quarter will focus on beginnings. The first two lessons deal with the beginning of everything—Creation and the first man. The next two are about the first sin and the first plan of escape from God’s judgment for sin. The next lesson is about the people who built the first “skyscraper” and the pitfalls of trying to be independent from God.

Four Bible characters will be studied: the first Hebrew, Abraham; the first leader, Moses; Israel’s first priest, Aaron; and the first king of Israel, Saul. There also will be a lesson on God’s first written Law.

The point of studying these lessons is to help us get a better understanding of some of the firsts in Bible history and, more importantly, to learn that, since the beginning of our world, each of these has played an important part in Gods plan for our lives. We want to grow spiritually from what we have learned.

QUESTIONS


1. Make a list of what God created on each of the six days.
2. Many say that the days mentioned in the Creation account are actually long periods of time. What does Scripture teach about the length of these days?
3. Can man create something from nothing? Explain. See Ecclesiastes 1:9-10.
4. What scientific principle is illustrated by each of these verses?

  • Job 26:7
  • Job 26:8
  • Job 26:10
  • Ecclesiastes 1:6
  • Ecclesiastes 1:7
  • Isaiah 40:22
  • Jeremiah 33:22
  • What is meant by the statement, “after his kind,” in the creation of the plants, water creatures, fowls, and animals?
  • Make a list of ways in which we benefit from the “lights” God made for us.
  • In studying the entire first chapter of Genesis, how is the existence of the Holy Trinity demonstrated in the account of the Creation?

Though no declaration which God makes needs to be substantiated by evidence or argument, the portions of His wonderful Book that touch upon the subject of Creation still serve greatly to strengthen our faith. For example, the Psalmist proclaims, “The heavens declare the glory of God; and the firmament sheweth his handiwork. Day unto day uttereth speech, and night unto night sheweth knowledge. There is no speech nor language, where their voice is not heard” (Psalm 19: 1-3). The heavens, and the earth also, are declaring to man by innumerable evidences-by the stars, by the seas, by the mountains, by the trees-that God is the Creator of all that is.

SUPPLEMENTAL SCRIPTURES


Nehemiah 9:6
Hebrews 11:3

INTRODUCTION
Every day of our lives should be lived in the center of God’s will. Measuring our daily actions by the Word of God will show us whether we are drawing closer to God or moving farther away. If we daily ask God to show us His will, and then follow His will, we can be sure of God’s blessing, and that He will be honored by the outcome of our lives.

THEME THOUGHTS

Christian maturity comes as a result of taking a realistic, practical, and God-directed approach to both the opportunities and the problems of life. That is why the admonitions found in the Bible are of proven value. They apply to the everyday experiences we face.

How to gain Christian maturity is the thrust of the lessons to be studied during this quarter.

The basic point to remember in considering the precepts of this unit is that submitting to Christ as our Lord and Savior comes first. With this thought in mind, we begin the unit by focusing on the reality of Jesus’ presence with us and in us.

The second lesson deals with the subject of Christian growth, establishing that God’s Word outlines certain ways and means of spiritual development, and that spiritual growth is necessary.

With these two lessons as the foundation for the quarter, we move into a consideration of specific areas such as decision-making, resisting the devil, avoiding physical and spiritual pollution, self-discipline, and how to deal with personal problems.

Our quarter concludes with a lesson on looking at the outcome, in which we will be encouraged to see the importance of measuring our daily actions by whether these actions will draw us closer to God or move us farther away.

Our goal this quarter is to reach the point where we can say with Paul, “. . . in all these things we are more than conquerors through him that loved us” (Romans 8:37).

QUESTION

  1. According to our text in Colossians 3:17,23, what is supposed to be the motivating factor in a Christian’s life? In what manner is this to be accomplished?
  2. Any act on our part that would cause a brother to stumble spiritually or to become offended is not good. See Romans 14:21. Scripture indicates that an opposite course of action is the responsibility of the Christian, and that conduct of this kind will bring about the outcome desired by God. What is this opposite course of action? See Romans 14:19.
  3. In 1 Corinthians 6:12, we read the phrase, “All things are lawful unto me, but all things are not expedient.” The word expedient means “useful, or helpful to attain some end.” In light of this definition, how does the phrase apply to a Christian’s life?
  4. Name some ways one might be “unequally yoked together with unbelievers” (2 Corinthians 6:14). What would be the likely adverse outcome of a Christian’s putting himself into such a situation?
  5. After reading 1 Thessalonians 5:22, explain what a Christian should do about evil. Name several ways this can be accomplished.
  6. The Bible says, “Abhor that which is evil; cleave to that which is good” (Romans 12:9). Make a list of things that are evil which a Christian encounters almost daily. How should we go about avoiding the evils that have been listed?
  7. In your own words explain how James tells us to plan for tomorrow (James 4:15). Why is this important?
  8. Knowing that 2 Corinthians 5:10 is true, why is it so important to look at the outcome of our daily living?

INTRODUCTION
Without a willingness to discipline oneself, and bring thoughts and actions into conformity with the Word of God, one cannot be a disciple of Jesus. Self-discipline, then, must be practised not only by ministers and missionaries but by everyone who desires to make Heaven his home. This means more than just forsaking sin and sinful pleasures. It includes a willingness to develop oneself spiritually and to make sacrifices for the Lord and His work.

INTRODUCTION

Jesus told the parable about the nobleman who was to go away, become a king, and return. This was one of Jesus’ last teachings to His disciples, taking place just before His triumphal entry into Jerusalem, and less than a week before His crucifixion. Christ’s purpose was to educate His disciples regarding His departure to Heaven, their responsibility to carry on His work after He went away, and His eventual return. Our study will concentrate on our responsibility as Christ’s disciples to be faithful in using what He has given us for His service.

THEME THOUGHTS

Christian maturity comes as a result of taking a realistic, practical, and God-directed approach to both the opportunities and the problems of life. That is why the admonitions found in the Bible are of proven value. They apply to the everyday experiences we face.

How to gain Christian maturity is the thrust of the lessons to be studied during this quarter.

The basic point to remember in considering the precepts of this unit is that submitting to Christ as our Lord and Savior comes first. With this thought in mind, we begin the unit by focusing on the reality of Jesus’ presence with us and in us.

The second lesson deals with the subject of Christian growth, establishing that God’s Word outlines certain ways and means of spiritual development, and that spiritual growth is necessary.

With these two lessons as the foundation for the quarter, we move into a consideration of specific areas such as decision-making, resisting the devil, avoiding physical and spiritual pollution, self-discipline, and how to deal with personal problems.

Our quarter concludes with a lesson on looking at the outcome, in which we will be encouraged to see the importance of measuring our daily actions by whether these actions will draw us closer to God or move us farther away.

Our goal this quarter is to reach the point where we can say with Paul, “. . . in all these things we are more than conquerors through him that loved us” (Romans 8:37).

QUESTION

  1. The word nobleman means “person of noble blood, usually princely.” Give evidence as to whom you think the nobleman represents in this parable. See Hebrews 12:2.
  2. The word servant is translated from the Greek word doulos which can mean “slave, bondman, or servant of a king.” In the New Testament epistles, doulos often denotes “one who gives himself up wholly to another’s will, or dominion.” With these facts in mind, identify whom the servants in this parable represent.
  3. The nobleman had ten servants. Each servant was given one pound. List the various gifts or talents which you think the pounds might represent. Refer to 1 Corinthians 12:4-11,28.
  4. Paraphrase the nobleman’s statement to his ten servants, “Occupy till I come.”
  5. Who are the citizens referred to in verses 14 and 27 of our lesson? How would you support this conclusion?
  6. Verse 15 tells us that having received his kingdom and returned, the nobleman called his servants to determine how much each man had gained by trading. Describe some of the “gains” one can experience in working for the Lord.
  7. Verses 20-26 deal with the other servant and his great error. Identify this error and interpret its meaning.
  8. The nobleman, in verse 17, pronounced the servant whose pound had gained ten pounds as “faithful.” Consider and note several actions which we could take to ensure a reward in eternity as a faithful steward of Jesus Christ.

 

INTRODUCTION

Were the heroes of faith in the Bible any different from the present-day child of God? Scripture tells us in James 5:17 that Elijah was a man subject to like passions as we are. He was an example of how a Christian, even today, can react in times of stress and pressure.

INTRODUCTION
Receiving salvation is not a guarantee that the Christian will face no difficulties. In fact, the Apostle Paul exhorted early Christians to continue in the faith, cautioning them that “we must through much tribulation enter into the kingdom of God” (Acts 14:22). But for those who remain true to God, there is deliverance and an answer to every troublesome problem. In this lesson, we see how the hand of the Lord was over Joseph and moved in his behalf though he faced hard trials and personal difficulties. His story has been an example to Christians through the ages.

THEME THOUGHTS

Christian maturity comes as a result of taking a realistic, practical, and God-directed approach to both the opportunities and the problems of life. That is why the admonitions found in the Bible are of proven value. They apply to the everyday experiences we face.

How to gain Christian maturity is the thrust of the lessons to be studied during this quarter.

The basic point to remember in considering the precepts of this unit is that submitting to Christ as our Lord and Savior comes first. With this thought in mind, we begin the unit by focusing on the reality of Jesus’ presence with us and in us.

The second lesson deals with the subject of Christian growth, establishing that God’s Word outlines certain ways and means of spiritual development, and that spiritual growth is necessary.

With these two lessons as the foundation for the quarter, we move into a consideration of specific areas such as decision-making, resisting the devil, avoiding physical and spiritual pollution, self-discipline, and how to deal with personal problems.

Our quarter concludes with a lesson on looking at the outcome, in which we will be encouraged to see the importance of measuring our daily actions by whether these actions will draw us closer to God or move us farther away.

Our goal this quarter is to reach the point where we can say with Paul, “. . . in all these things we are more than conquerors through him that loved us” (Romans 8:37)

QUESTION
  1. After reading the Genesis portion of our text, list the problems that were facing Joseph at this time in his life.
  2. The problems faced by Joseph seemed to revolve, for the most part, around his relationships with other people—just as the problems facing us often do. The Scriptures give us many guidelines which direct our responses and reactions to others. Look up the following verses and note the attitudes we should maintain toward others to alleviate or minimize differences.
    • Romans 12:10
    • Romans 12:14
    • Galatians 5:14
    • Galatians 6:1
    • Colossians 3:13
  3. What was Joseph’s response when his father asked him to journey to Shechem to inquire after his brothers’ welfare? In view of the fact that his brothers hated and envied him, what was notable about Joseph’s answer and what lesson can we learn from it?
  4. In Genesis 37:15, we find Joseph facing a completely different type of problem. Identify his dif­ficulty, and explain how a solution was provided.
  5. Verses 19 and 20 reflect the contempt Joseph’s brothers felt for him. As Christians today, we must sometimes face contempt for ourselves and for our beliefs. How are we to react to this and what will occur if we follow the admonition given in Scripture? See Matthew 5:11-12 and 1 Peter 2:19-20.
  6. God, in His infinite wisdom, may allow trials to come for various reasons. Looking at Psalm 105:16-17, for what reason did Joseph have to go to Egypt?
  7. Hebrews 12:11 brings out another reason we may need to go through some times of trial and testing. Identify the reason and explain what benefit it will bring.
  8. In 1 Peter 4:19 there is a qualifying phrase which defines to whom this instruction is given. What is the phrase and why is it important?
INTRODUCTION
Paul, even though having been in prison for a long time, was not hesitant to do service for God by giving his testimony. As he stood before King Agrippa, the account of his conversion and how he answered God’s call gives us a beautiful example of a complete change, total dedication and sacrifice. We are called by the same Christ to the same Gospel. Willing service for the salvation of souls in every phase of the Lord’s work brings eternal reward.
QUESTION
  1. Paul told King Agrippa that at an earlier time in his life, his ambition had been to put the followers of Jesus into prison, see them persecuted and even put to death. His attitude had been one of anger toward the followers of Jesus. Explain what brought about the change in his attitude, and tell why you think Paul was so willing to give his testimony before the King. Refer to Acts 9.
  2. The word surrender means “to give up claim, or to yield to another.” How do you think this word relates to service for God?
  3. There are some important principles established in Scripture concerning the call of God. Read Romans 11:29 and 1 Corinthians 9:16-17, and note what points you find in these verses.
  4. Reading verse 16 in our text, we find part of Paul’s call was to “witness.” What spiritual experience will help us fulfill this part of our call? See Acts 1:8.
  5. When Jesus sent His disciples into the cities, they were told that the conditions they would face might not always be pleasant. They were sent as lambs among wolves. They were to carry no provisions. They were not guaranteed a welcome. Why were they sent? How did things turn out for them? What was their attitude upon their return to Jesus? See Luke 10:1,17 and 22:35.
  6. Willing service to God is more an attitude than an obligation. If the question is posed, “Are you willing?” what is your response? If the response is, “If I have to . . .” or “I guess I can . . . ,” the attitude is saying, “I really don’t want to.” In today’s society we are told not to commit or box ourselves in because life is too short. But this is a trick of the devil to keep us from serving the Lord. Psalm 40:8 contains a key word which reflects a certain attitude that we should maintain as we serve the Lord. Note the word, and describe how you think it applies to our Christian service. Then briefly describe how an opposite attitude might affect our service.
  7. The magnitude of needs in the spreading of the Gospel, may sometimes seem almost overwhelming. We need to be aware that our duty is not universal, but rather personal and individual. God does not command us to “Go and do everything,” but He marks out a special path for each of us. Once we have committed ourselves fully to Christ and have told Him we are willing to do whatever He gives us to do, how can we know just what that service should be? Proverbs 3:5-6 will give you some direction in noting your answer.
  8. In today’s society we often find that those in lesser circumstances are in a position of serving those who are more affluent. Matthew 23:11 establishes a Biblical perspective which is somewhat different. In your own words, elaborate on true greatness as brought out in this Scripture.
INTRODUCTION
Who should we believe? Which report is true? Who should we follow? These questions must have been heavy on the minds of the Children of Israel when they heard the conflicting reports from the twelve men who had returned from spying out the land of Canaan. Their trust in God’s promise had been overcome by doubt and fear. We, too, are faced each day with the challenge of distinguishing between right and wrong. And, many times, the consequences of wrong decisions are as grave as they were for the Children of Israel. Let’s not forget God’s promises to us.
QUESTION
  1. The history of the Children of Israel, no doubt, would read differently if the people had followed Caleb and Joshua rather than the other ten spies. Explain the reason why it makes a difference to us whom we follow in our day.
  2. It is not always easy to make the correct differentiation between truth and error, especially when the pressure is great from those around you to pursue a course other than the right one. For example, would it have been easy for you to make the right choice between the conflicting reports given by the twelve spies in our text? On what should the Children of Israel have based their decision?
  3. Ten men said Israel couldn’t take the land, while Joshua and Caleb insisted that it could be done. Because they took their stand for what was right, they were the only two of their generation who entered the Promised Land. What spiritual lesson can we learn from this?
  4. Imagine the feelings of Joshua and Caleb when they realized that the people were siding with the other ten spies. There may be situations in our lives which cause us to be uncomfortable but force us to take a stand. For example: In a high school science class, the question is asked if anyone believes in the Biblical account of creation. No one raises his hand—but you believe. Will you raise your hand? Your face turns red, your palms are sweaty, beads of perspiration are on your brow, and you raise your hand. You hear a ripple of laughter. The teacher rolls his eyes. Give another similar situation that could necessitate standing up for the Lord. Name some emotions that might accompany taking this stand, and give pos­sible reactions to it.
  5. It is important to remember scriptural promises in these times when we must take a stand. Read Philippians 4:13 and explain how this verse could help.
  6. Define the word world in the context of 1 John 2:15-17. What are the consequences of daring to be different from the world?
  7. How can we obtain the spiritual strength to take a stand for what we know is right? See Psalm 27:1 and Isaiah 40:29-31.
  8. Give a Biblical example of a person who took a stand even though opposed by those around him.